depression anxiety – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 02:01:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dystonia-dreams.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70x70.jpg depression anxiety – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ 32 32 Why a robust and holistic approach to corporate mental health is essential https://dystonia-dreams.org/why-a-robust-and-holistic-approach-to-corporate-mental-health-is-essential/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 04:01:01 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/why-a-robust-and-holistic-approach-to-corporate-mental-health-is-essential/ In the late 90s, Liz Hilton Segel was leading a group at consulting firm McKinsey & Company when she noticed something was wrong with one of her team members. They were working around the clock on a fast-paced project, and his work was uncharacteristically missing the mark. He said he was in the middle of […]]]>

In the late 90s, Liz Hilton Segel was leading a group at consulting firm McKinsey & Company when she noticed something was wrong with one of her team members. They were working around the clock on a fast-paced project, and his work was uncharacteristically missing the mark. He said he was in the middle of a depressive episode and needed a break from work immediately. “He literally left the office that day, at 5:00 p.m. on a Wednesday,” Hilton Segel recalled. “And I completely missed it. I could have seen what was going on, I could have seen it in his physical appearance, in the way he spoke. But I did not do it.

The experience remained with Hilton Segel, which is now McKinsey’s global industry practice leader. As the issue of mental health in the workplace has gained more attention in recent years, Hilton Segel wants to ensure that employees get the support and interventions they need and that employers take the right steps. to solve these problems in the workplace. “We need to teach people to search, to ask, to check if someone is okay,” she says. “It’s about changing people’s lives.”

THE BENEFITS OF MENTAL WELLNESS SUPPORT

Mental health issues, including depression and anxiety, are not new to the workplace. Ever since there have been W-2s, workers have struggled to balance their mental health and well-being with the rigors of their jobs. But over the past two years, the number of workers struggling with mental health issues has risen sharply. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 30% of adults reported symptoms of anxiety and depression– an almost three-fold increase compared to before the pandemic. “Every employer has seen the rise in mental health issues,” says Katy George, McKinsey’s chief human resources officer. “We’ve seen a whole host of depression, anxiety and isolation issues increase significantly.”

Failing to support employee mental health can cost companies dearly. Productivity can suffer and talent can head for the exits, sometimes abruptly. And companies with a reputation for not supporting the mental health of their employees may have a harder time recruiting top talent. Investing in employee mental health, on the other hand, offers many benefits to companies. To begin with, these investments can offer a considerable return: the World Health Organization estimates that every dollar invested in treating depression and anxiety yields $4 in productivity gains.

Beyond productivity, providing this kind of support to employees can help them do their best, most innovative and creative work. “If you’re in a stressful, sleep-deprived state and I ask you to be creative or handle a tense situation, you’re just not going to get it,” Hilton Segel says. “Part of the benefit to an employer is giving people the fuel or energy that allows them to actually display the level of creativity or emotional resilience that they need.”

A CULTURAL CONVERSATION

So how can companies take a more proactive approach to employee mental health? The first step is to recognize that supporting mental health requires more than providing benefits such as increased therapy coverage. “We need to move mental health from a benefits conversation to a cultural conversation,” says George. “It’s about rejecting stigma and making people feel safe talking about their mental health needs.”

McKinsey is moving in this direction through initiatives such as learning programs that help employees manage their own mental health, as well as support the health of their colleagues. It is rolling out training programs to help employees identify colleagues who might be having trouble and offer support if they see signs of mental illness or distress. As part of this work, McKinsey has created a program called Mind Matters, which includes training 150 “mental health champions” at each of McKinsey’s locations around the world. These individuals can help employees through the process of supporting colleagues struggling with mental health issues while serving as a bridge to help employees in crisis access the full range of benefits available to them.

The company also extends these conversations beyond its walls. He launches McKinsey Health Institute (MHI) to catalyze action on health across continents, industries and communities. “One of MHI’s primary areas of focus is mental health and wellness,” Hilton Segel says. “We hope to foster a global conversation about how employers can advance the state of the art, learn from each other, and materially improve the health of their employees and communities. In the same way that McKinsey Global Institute focuses on economic productivity, MHI will focus on the well-being of all.

The pandemic has forced many companies to rethink their relationships with employees, from their expectations of how, when and where to work, to how they can increase employee satisfaction at work. Supporting employee mental health is a key part of this puzzle. “Work is such an important part of our lives, and employers have an obligation to support the well-being of our employee base,” Hilton Segel says. “And there are huge benefits to doing so, because it can unleash creativity, innovation and workforce productivity.”

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CBT is wrong in its understanding of mental illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/cbt-is-wrong-in-its-understanding-of-mental-illness/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 15:03:42 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/cbt-is-wrong-in-its-understanding-of-mental-illness/ Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most popular forms of talk therapy. It is the treatment of choice for depression and anxiety and is an essential part of public healthcare systems, such as the NHS and Australia’s Medicare system. CBT’s understanding of mental illness and therapeutic techniques is already mainstream – accusations of ‘catastrophizing’ […]]]>

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most popular forms of talk therapy. It is the treatment of choice for depression and anxiety and is an essential part of public healthcare systems, such as the NHS and Australia’s Medicare system. CBT’s understanding of mental illness and therapeutic techniques is already mainstream – accusations of ‘catastrophizing’ and calls to ‘reality check’ beliefs is everywhere. Like a Washington Post article put it: “For better or for worse, cognitive therapy is quickly becoming what people mean when they say they’re ‘going into therapy’.”

One of the reasons for the meteoric success of CBT is the amount of evidence supporting its effectiveness treat a host of mental health issues. Although there is evidence for the effectiveness of CBT, the evidence for its theory, particularly its understanding of mental illness, is much more mixed. To put it another way, we know CBT works, but we don’t know how or why it works.

Aaron Beck, the founder of CBT.
Sipa US / Alamy Stock Photo

CCT cognitive model of mental illnessinitially developed by Aaron Beck in the 1960s, hypothesized that disorders such as depression were characterized by certain thought patterns that engender the negative emotions and behaviors typical of mental illness. These thought patterns are called “cognitive distortions” or “negative automatic thoughts.”

But what exactly is wrong with these thoughts? What makes them “deformed”? Generally, vague answers are offered in response. For example, the American Psychological Association describes these thoughts as being “defective” or “useless”. Look distortion listsoffers clues.

Most distortions focus on faulty reasoning, where someone “jumps to conclusions”, makes the wrong inference (“overgeneralization”), is biased in how they view a situation (“black or white thinking”) , or, more simply, when he believes something wrong or inaccurate. CBT then goes on to suggest that if this flawed reasoning were resolved, the “unnecessary” negative emotions and behaviors would change.

Three reasons to doubt the model

There are three reasons to doubt the cognitive model and the association of mental illness with reasoning errors.

First, the kind of issues that CBT draws attention to — biases, false beliefs, wrong inferences — are all relatively common, even in mentally healthy people. Like many psychological research showed, we are all prone to bad reasoning. And even with mental disorders that seem to involve obvious mistaken thinking, such as schizophrenia or psychosis, it is very difficult to tell the difference between a delusion and a strange belief. For example, what distinguishes delusions from the kinds of beliefs associated with conspiracy theories or belief in the supernatural? “Wrong” thinking is obviously not correlated with mental illness.

Second, although CBT researchers have studies showing that mental disorders have something to do with cognitive distortions, there is a problem with the tests or measures used in this research. Many of these tests ask questions that have nothing to do with poor reasoning. They often ask people to answer questions that are simply about how they feel (“I’m so disappointed in myself”, Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire), need a lot more information, perhaps population-level data to answer (“I do few things as well as others”, Inventory of cognitive distortions), or seem to be about moral or practical matters rather than bad reasoning (“To take even a small risk is foolish because the loss is likely to be a disaster”, “To be a good, moral and worthwhile person, I must help all who need it,” Dysfunctional Attitude Scale).

Finally, research suggests that it is mental health rather than mental illness that is linked to poor reasoning. The “depressive realism hypothesis” shows that depressed people more specifically: predict the degree of control they have over the results, assess their performance and recall comments.

Mentally healthy people, on the other hand, succumb to an “illusion of control” and tend to remember their own performances and comments in an excessively rosy light. Although most of this research has focused on depression, some studies suggest that schizophrenia may be associated with better theoretical reasoning and autism is sometimes characterized by enhanced logical and theoretical reasoning.

Not supported by research

Not only is there evidence to the contrary showing that reasoning problems are widespread and potentially associated with mental health rather than mental disorders. But the evidence in favor of CBT treating mental illness is flawed because the tests used in these studies don’t even track reasoning problems. CBT provides a compelling story about mental illness – mental illness is associated with “flawed” thinking, and by addressing this, negative behaviors and emotions are addressed. Unfortunately, research does not quite confirm this story.

One can wonder if it is important. After all, CBT seems to work, so why should we care if it works or if it’s fake in its history of mental illness?

It is important from an ethical point of view. It’s one thing to point out that certain thought patterns are “useless” or cause negative emotions and behaviors, it’s quite another to suggest that someone is irrational or reasons poorly when the evidence for this is fragile. This is what the philosopher Miranda Fricker calls “epistemic injusticewhere a member of a disenfranchised (i.e. mentally ill) group is told that their claims are flawed or cannot be taken at face value. Worse still, with CBT, they are told this when they come for help. Disturbing at best, unethical at worst.

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Quintez Brown case shows need for reform of bail and mental health services https://dystonia-dreams.org/quintez-brown-case-shows-need-for-reform-of-bail-and-mental-health-services/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 10:56:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/quintez-brown-case-shows-need-for-reform-of-bail-and-mental-health-services/ I don’t know why we can’t do better than that, why our only answer for someone accused of a crime that the lawyers say shows all the signs of mental illness, is to put them in a prison that cannot adequately care for him or keep him cool at home, where we do not know […]]]>

I don’t know why we can’t do better than that, why our only answer for someone accused of a crime that the lawyers say shows all the signs of mental illness, is to put them in a prison that cannot adequately care for him or keep him cool at home, where we do not know if he is receiving or can receive the treatment he needs.

But in the case of Quintez Brown, that’s where we are.

According to police, Brown, a former Courier Journal intern and student at the University of Louisville, visited the campaign headquarters of mayoral candidate Craig Greenberg on the morning of February 14, pulled out a 9mm handgun and opened fire.

Fortunately, Brown is not a good shooter and missed Greenberg and the four members of his team who were in the room with him. A bullet came close enough to Greenberg to rip a hole in the sweater he was wearing, however.

Quintez Brown on Broadway and Roy Wilkins Avenue on Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Brown was charged with attempted murder and four counts of wanton endangerment. He pleaded not guilty. His attorney told the court he believed Brown was suffering from a serious mental health crisis and wanted Brown to see a psychiatrist immediately.

Those of us who know Brown think the attorney, Rob Eggert, is right.

It’s the only thing that could explain why Brown, a young man on a full scholarship to the U of L, a local leader in the social justice movement with dreams of becoming a civil rights lawyer, would do what he is accused.

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Mother and daughter role models open up about mental health issues to help train health workers https://dystonia-dreams.org/mother-and-daughter-role-models-open-up-about-mental-health-issues-to-help-train-health-workers/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 09:54:17 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/mother-and-daughter-role-models-open-up-about-mental-health-issues-to-help-train-health-workers/ //= do_shortcode(‘[in-content-square]’) ?> Brigitte Prior and her daughter Angelina A caregiver and model who helped her teenage daughter overcome acute depression and anxiety is sharing her experiences to help train medical professionals treating mental illness. Brigitte Prior, who works as a medical assistant at Gwern Alyn care home in Pendine Park in Wrexham, has been […]]]>
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Brigitte Prior and her daughter Angelina

A caregiver and model who helped her teenage daughter overcome acute depression and anxiety is sharing her experiences to help train medical professionals treating mental illness.

Brigitte Prior, who works as a medical assistant at Gwern Alyn care home in Pendine Park in Wrexham, has been invited as a guest speaker at online training sessions run by her daughter’s former therapist, Nicola English, at the Bangor University.

Angelina Prior, 19, battled suicidal thoughts, self-harm and anorexia during the height of her mental health struggles which began at the age of 14.

Brigitte says her daughter’s life was saved thanks to the intervention of Wrexham Child Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), where Nicola previously worked as a therapist.

Now, having transformed her life, Angelina and Brigitte, students at the University of Leeds, are both giving back by using their experiences to help medical professionals understand the depths of mental illness in adolescents.

Beauty pageant contestant Brigitte, who was born in Rinteln, northern Germany, and now lives in Wrexham, said: ‘It’s great that we can now try to help with the experience we have lived.

“If we can help healthcare professionals see things from our perspective and see the whole child, not just the prognosis, that’s a good thing. It’s very important for them to see how you deal with mental illness as a family.

“Angelina was probably around 14 when it all started. She told me she was depressed and I immediately took her to the doctor, but I didn’t think too much about it. I didn’t expect what they would say next – that it was really serious and that she had suicidal thoughts all the time.

“She was so bad she was referred right away. It was an absolute shock to me as a mom because I didn’t see it coming.

“She missed school for months, lying in a dark room against the wall, it was horrible. She was really bad. In the end, she had to move to another school – Haulfan School in Wrexham , which is a student guidance service only for young people with mental health and anxiety issues.

“They were absolutely fantastic and between them, CAMHS and our immediate family, I think we saved Angelina’s life.”

“Endangering life”

Angelina, who recently followed in her mother’s footsteps into part-time modeling, is now studying for a degree in business management at the University of Leeds having achieved A* across the board in her A-Levels.

“It would mean the world to me if hearing about my experiences would help even one person,” she said.

“I struggled for many years with thoughts of inadequacy and loneliness. There were many points in high school that added to my rapidly deteriorating mental health, such as exam stress, bullying and the fact that my friends no longer wanted to associate with me.

“I was self-harming every day which resulted in permanent scarring all over, and I developed anorexia which became fatal very quickly. For years I was extremely suicidal and felt like the whole world and my family would be better off without me.

“However, throughout this difficult time, I had the privilege of being a client of Nicola English at Wrexham Child Adolescent Mental Health Services. Nicola helped me by providing me with strategies and routines that I could use when I felt weak.

“She also taught me healthy coping mechanisms that I could replace unhealthy ones with.”

Gwern Alyn’s manager, Cindy Clutton, congratulated Brigitte and Angelina on their new roles.

She said: “To relive this difficult time in Angelina’s life is an extremely courageous thing to do and I commend Brigitte and Angelina for their courage.

“Their combined experiences and knowledge will be extremely valuable to these professionals and help improve the support and services available for adolescents with mental health issues in the future.

“Brigitte is a kind and compassionate caregiver, who always puts others before herself. It’s no surprise that she wants to help other young people in this personal and poignant way. I wish Brigitte and Angelina every success in this training project.

Pendine Park Gwern Alyn care practitioner Brigitte Prior who models. Photo Mandy Jones

‘Miracle’

Brigitte, who recently represented Miss Clwyd in the national final of the Classic Miss British Isles 2020/21 model competition and has appeared in photography magazines, said she was honored to be part of the new training sessions for the university and has already participated in an online discussion.

The mother-of-two suffered from her own mental health challenges until around 10 years ago and is keen to help improve services for others facing the same difficulties in the future.

She added, “The first online teaching session was nerve-wracking, but people said it really helped them and I was so glad I did. It’s daunting, but Nicola asked me a lot of questions which helped me out,” said Brigitte, who previously worked at Penybryn nursing home in Pendine, where she cared for people suffering of brain damage.

“They were interested in my perspective as a mom. We are what we call “experienced experts”.

“There are so many young people who suffer from mental health issues, for example because of the pressure to think they have to look a certain way, especially on social media

“Bullying doesn’t stop in the classroom – you’re followed everywhere online, there’s no escape. I wouldn’t want to be young today.

“My daughter had a lot of mental health issues but luckily she’s doing much better now. She’s at university and really enjoying her life – it’s a miracle.

Angelina added: ‘I’ve always thought people were lying to me or being clichéd when they said things were getting better over time, but in the last few years I’ve noticed an astronomical change in myself incorporating the things learned. in therapy and also doing my own. researching recovery, such as reading self-help books or listening to podcasts.

“The best thing to do is find something that makes you happy and focus on it. And please don’t give up, no matter how difficult things may seem at the time. They will always improve.”


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Low treatment coverage for mental health disorders worldwide: study https://dystonia-dreams.org/low-treatment-coverage-for-mental-health-disorders-worldwide-study/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 12:49:39 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/low-treatment-coverage-for-mental-health-disorders-worldwide-study/ Treatment coverage for major depressive disorder (MDD) remains low worldwide despite it being the leading cause of disability. According to research conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, only 33% of people diagnosed with MDD in high-income countries and a measly 8% in low- and lower-middle-income countries have […]]]>

Treatment coverage for major depressive disorder (MDD) remains low worldwide despite it being the leading cause of disability. According to research conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, only 33% of people diagnosed with MDD in high-income countries and a measly 8% in low- and lower-middle-income countries have used mental health services.

The study, published in OLP journal – a non-profit open-access science, technology and medical publisher – on February 15, aims to provide a comprehensive review of MDD treatment coverage estimates and gaps by location and type of treatment between 2000 and 2019.

Nearly 75% of patients with MDD worldwide live in low- and lower-middle-income countries, according to the study titled “The Global Gap in Treatment Coverage for Major Depressive Disorder in 84 Countries from 2000 to 2019 : a systematic review and a Bayesian meta-regression analysis’, showed.

The study was based on a meta-regression analysis of data from 149 studies, 342 data points and 84 countries between 2000 and 2021 on the treatment of MDD. While global health financing has always been a priority for malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, which are among the leading causes of disability and death in many low- and middle-income countries, financing for mental health is still far from sufficient, he noted. .

In 2019, development assistance for health (DAH) for non-communicable diseases (which includes mental disorders) for Sustainable Development Goal 3 targets was $0.7 billion for 135 countries low- and middle-income, less than 2% of the estimated 2019 DAH total of $40.6 billion. “Therefore,” the study states, “it is important to align funding priorities with epidemiological changes in countries that may be accompanied by an increased burden of noncommunicable diseases, including mental disorders. “.

Previous analysis showed that scaling up effective treatment for depression and anxiety disorders led to 43 million additional years of healthy life and a net present economic value of $310 billion between 2016 and 2030, said the researchers.

In conclusion, the study said: “Ultimately, our findings underscore the need for governments and policy makers to reconsider the availability of appropriate MDD care and treatment facilitators as they respond to the heavy burden imposed by this disorder.

MENTAL HEALTH EPIDEMIC IN INDIA

Mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and neuropsychotic disorders, contribute 18.5% to the global burden of disease. India bears a disproportionate share of this burden with 56 million cases of depression, 43 million anxiety disorders and a large number of people committing suicide daily. The World Health Organization estimates the economic loss due to mental health problems in India between 2012 and 2030 at Rs 75.84 lakh crore.

While developed countries allocate 5-18% of their annual health budget to mental health, India spends about 0.05%. In a rare instance, declining mental health among Indians was mentioned in the 2022-2023 budget speech of Union Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. “The pandemic has accentuated mental health problems in people of all ages,” she said, announcing the launch of a national telemental health program to “improve access to counseling and care services in quality mental health”.

The program will include a network of 23 mental health telecentres of excellence. “The National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) will be the nodal center and the Indian Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore will provide technological support,” Sitharaman said.

In addition, an open platform for the national digital health ecosystem will be rolled out. “It will consist of digital registers of health providers and health facilities; a single health identity; consent framework and universal access to health facilities,” the minister said.

The National Mental Health Program (NMHP) was launched in 1982. A District Mental Health Program was later launched under the NMHP under the Ninth Five Year Plan in 1996. It is supposed to provide mental health services in 692 districts. Apart from the NMHP, the Center also funds two NIMHANS Bengaluru institutes and the Lokpriya Gopinath Bordoloi Regional Mental Health Institute in Tezpur, Assam.

The budget increased the allocation for NIMHANS from around Rs 500 crore to Rs 560 crore and Lokpriya Gopinath Bordoloi Regional Mental Health Institute from Rs 57 crore to 70 crore from last fiscal year.

Unfortunately, the grant for NMHP remained unchanged at Rs 40 crore. The allocation of funds to mental health services is still only 0.81% of the total expenditure of Rs 71,269 crore for the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

Despite the low allocation to NMHP, funds have been underutilized even during the pandemic. In 2021, the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Health and Family Welfare highlighted the underspending of funds. “The Committee is of the view that a consistent underspending over the years in this capacity is a clear indication of the department’s inability to understand the magnitude of the mental health burden in the country.”

Despite studies highlighting “the high prevalence of mental illness in the country”, no “substantial progress has been made in facilitating a robust mental health service delivery mechanism”, the Committee added.

In its analysis of the 2021-2022 budget, the Indian Mental Health Observatory had mentioned that different population groups face varying levels of emotional distress which in some cases may have been aggravated by psychosocial and economic factors, including job loss, depleted savings, and financial insecurity has plagued large sections of the population, especially those working in the informal sector. “Lack of social interaction has implications for children’s emotional and social development,” he said.

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One in seven people suffer from mental disorders, study finds | Delhi News https://dystonia-dreams.org/one-in-seven-people-suffer-from-mental-disorders-study-finds-delhi-news/ Tue, 24 Dec 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/one-in-seven-people-suffer-from-mental-disorders-study-finds-delhi-news/ NEW DELHI: Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common mental disorders and their prevalence is increasing across India, according to a study published in the Lancet Psychiatry. According to the results of the study whose results were published on Monday, 197 million Indians (14.3% of the total population) suffered from mental disorders in 2017. […]]]>
NEW DELHI: Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common mental disorders and their prevalence is increasing across India, according to a study published in the Lancet Psychiatry.
According to the results of the study whose results were published on Monday, 197 million Indians (14.3% of the total population) suffered from mental disorders in 2017. Of these, 46 million people suffered from depression and 45 million suffered from anxiety disorders.

In Delhi, the year of life lost due to death or lived with disability due to depressive disorders and anxiety disorders was calculated at 459 years and 321 years, respectively, out of an average of 1,00,000 years.
Dr. Rajesh Sagar, professor of psychiatry at AIIMS, said that stress is one of the main causes of depression and anxiety disorders. “Among children, bullying mainly led to the two mental disorders,” he added.
According to Dr. Sagar, due to the changing social environment, the mechanism to deal with these diseases is also affected. “Before, in mixed families, a lot of the stress and anxiety was relieved because there were people to share their problems with. But now most families are nuclear,” he said.
Across India, the contribution of mental disorders to the total burden of disease in India in terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) increased from 2.5% in 1990 to 4.7% in 2017 .
Mental disorders were India’s largest contributor to years lived with disability (YLD), contributing 14.5% of all YLDs in 2017.
The prevalence of depression is highest among older people, doctors said. State-specific findings published in The Lancet Psychiatry also highlight the extent of effort needed in each state to address mental health, which could serve as a benchmark for policymakers to plan approaches to reduce the growing burden. systematic mental disorders.
“The prevalence of adult mental disorders is higher in the southern states and that of childhood mental disorders is higher in the northern states,” said Prof Balram Bhargav, chief executive of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), citing the research findings. .
“Given the significant contribution of mental disorders to the disease burden in India, further research should continue to track the changing trends of mental disorders in different parts of the country,” he added.
Dr. Lalit Dandona, director of the India State-Level Disease Burden Initiative, said the high rate of depression among older people reported in this study is concerning and requires special attention. The significant association of suicide with depression underscores the need to identify and treat depression through broader community and health system efforts.
“Mental illnesses contribute significantly to the disease burden in India, as reported in this study. There is an urgent need to strengthen mental health services, integrate them into general health care and remove barriers such as stigma and access to treatment.

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One in seven people suffer from mental disorders in India: Indian Council of Medical Research study, India News News https://dystonia-dreams.org/one-in-seven-people-suffer-from-mental-disorders-in-india-indian-council-of-medical-research-study-india-news-news/ Mon, 23 Dec 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/one-in-seven-people-suffer-from-mental-disorders-in-india-indian-council-of-medical-research-study-india-news-news/ About one in seven people in India suffered from mental disorders of varying severity in 2017, with depression and anxiety disorders being the most common mental disorders affecting 45.7 million and 44.9 million people each in the country, noted the findings of a first in-depth study by Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) on the […]]]>

About one in seven people in India suffered from mental disorders of varying severity in 2017, with depression and anxiety disorders being the most common mental disorders affecting 45.7 million and 44.9 million people each in the country, noted the findings of a first in-depth study by Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) on the burden of disease due to mental disorders in India.

Research has shown that there is a significant increase in the incidence of mental health disorders in India over the years.

The ICMR findings clearly indicated that around 197 million people, or about one in seven Indians, suffered from any type of mental disorder in 2017.

These include depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, idiopathic developmental intellectual disability, conduct disorder and autism. “We found that depression is highest in the elderly, which has important implications for India’s aging population. Depression contributed to 33.8% of all mental disorders, followed by anxiety disorders (19.0%), idiopathic developmental intellectual disability (10.8%), and schizophrenia (9.8%),” Professor Balram Bhargav, chief executive of ICMR, told ANI.

As depression is associated with suicide deaths in India, our big concern is to tackle it and with this association we found that it is slightly stronger in women than in men, added (Prof) Bhargava .

The study is now published in the latest issue of The Lancet Psychiatry journal under the India State-Level Disease Burden Initiative of ICMR and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI).

“The prevalence of mental disorders doubled between 1990 and 2017. To understand the burden of mental health, we researched all available data sources in India to bring this state-specific scientific paper on mental health problems in India,” Professor Lalit Dandona said. , the director of the Indian State Burden of Disease Initiative told ANI.

Among mental disorders that occurred during childhood and adolescence, the prevalence of idiopathic developmental intellectual disability was 4.5%, conduct disorder 0.80%, hyperactivity disorder attention by 0.42% and autism spectrum disorders by 0.35%.

Dr. Rajesh Sagar, lead author of the story and Professor of Psychiatry at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), said: “Mental illnesses are increasing in India at a breakneck pace. There is an urgent need to improve mental health services, create awareness, eliminate social stigma and generate access to treatment.”

“Parents and children need to be educated. In the study, we noted that the prevalence of mental disorders in children and adolescents was higher in the less developed northern states, and that of mental disorders in higher adulthood in more developed southern states,” he said.

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Is veganism a mental disorder? https://dystonia-dreams.org/is-veganism-a-mental-disorder/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/is-veganism-a-mental-disorder/ **This blog is written by contributor Shiri Raz, PhD student in psychoanalysis and philosophy (Bar-Ilan University) In 1909, neuroscientist Charles Loomis Dana coined the term “zoophilpsychosis” to describe a unique mental illness, a distinct psychosis, characterized by an increased concern for animals. The discourse on the new disease quickly crossed the borders of the academy, […]]]>

**This blog is written by contributor Shiri Raz, PhD student in psychoanalysis and philosophy (Bar-Ilan University)

In 1909, neuroscientist Charles Loomis Dana coined the term “zoophilpsychosis” to describe a unique mental illness, a distinct psychosis, characterized by an increased concern for animals. The discourse on the new disease quickly crossed the borders of the academy, and a few months later that year, the New York Times headlined: “Passion for animals – really a disease”. The body of the article explained that people suffering from “zoophilpsychosis” are sick people and that their care for animals involves hardening their hearts to humans.

This was a period marked by considerable controversy over the common practice of vivisection. The new term helped Dana and her colleagues who performed vivisection in their labs to label their opponents as mentally ill.

Over the years, horrific vivisection experiments have become culturally obsolete in most societies and new regulations have been created regarding animal experiments. As a result, the diagnosis that Dana offered to opponents of vivisection experiments was rejected. However, even today, similar attempts and research can be found to link a position that opposes the use of animals, such as vegetarianism or veganism, with various mental illnesses.

For example, in their 2001 study, Perry and colleagues argued that vegetarianism in adolescents might be a signal for preventive intervention suicidal behavior, Baines and colleagues concluded that vegetarian and vegan women are better off. physical health but more vulnerable to depression and mood disorders and Michalak, Zhang and Jacobi in their 2012 paper, argued that the percentage of people with depression and anxiety disorders was higher among vegetarians (and vegans) than in meat eaters. To name a few.

Although the methods of investigation of these researchers and their validity can be disputed, it is difficult to ignore the link that they seek to highlight. Moreover, it is crucial to address them to avoid attempts to pathologize vegetarianism and veganism.

Pathologization is the attempt to define a particular condition – for example, vegetarianism and veganism – as a pathological condition, and the people who choose these lifestyles as diseased. Such efforts can be seen in the article by Michalak, Zhang and Jacobi who offer different “pathological” explanations. For example, the thesis that a vegetarian/vegan diet causes omega-3 and vitamin B-12 deficiencies which affect brain processes and therefore “increase the risk of developing mental disorders”.

Besides the creativity that can be found in these theses and explanations, most of them do not stand the test of reality. A balanced vegetarian and vegan diet does not lead to deficiencies and is defined by the “Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics” as a diet suitable for everyone, of all ages – and more, as having benefits in reducing risk factors. for the greatest number. common ailments that plague Western society. This begs the question – what could explain the link between vegetarianism and veganism and greater vulnerability to depression and anxiety? And is there an explanation that doesn’t pathologize people who choose a lifestyle that avoids harming animals?

I believe there are.

From my experience as a therapist who specializes in working with vegans, I find that the same admirable traits that led them to choose this lifestyle are traits that can create vulnerability to depression and anxiety. in the complex world we live in. Qualities like a strong sense of justice, a critical view of the world and of themselves, social awareness, empathy, courage – are just a few.

This hypothesis is also supported by the findings of Dr. Elaine Aron, author of “Highly Sensitive Person”. According to Dr. Aron’s theory, as any attribute such as height, weight or musical talent is generally distributed in the population according to a normal distribution, therefore there is a normal distribution of sensitivity to sensory and emotional stimuli. Aron classifies about 15% to 20% of people as highly sensitive people and characterizes this group with high depth of thought, emotional intelligence and creativity, and greater vulnerability to depression and mood disorders. because of the same sensitivity to the reality of a complex world of injustice and suffering.

The physiological explanation given by Aron is that the nervous system of a very sensitive person is more sensitive to stimuli compared to the average. From this, it can be hypothesized that relatively minimal exposure to animal suffering in human industries, such as a lecture or video, will lead to a more powerful emotional response than others. With the combination of traits such as the courage to change and make a change, to be different, to speak up for someone else’s rights – one is likely to choose veganism.

Moreover, in a world where animal use and abuse is ubiquitous, this emotional exposure is gradually becoming a chronic, mental experience that almost no one understands. It is a very lonely experience of pain, sometimes accompanied by accusations from others of being “heavy”, critical, overly sensitive or extremist, making this experience even more awkward. I call this overall pain experience a “vegan trauma”.

That is, contrary to the picture Dana sought to paint in the early 20th century, vegetarianism and veganism are not pathological or any form of mental disorder, they are not a cause of mental disorder nor characteristic of people with depression or mood disorders. These are moral choices. Moral and responsible choices of people with healthy and sensitive hearts, clear thinking and the courage to change. They are leaders, brave to be the first; healthy people in an often troubled and sick world.

**This blog is written by contributor Shiri Raz, PhD student in psychoanalysis and philosophy (Bar-Ilan University)

Shiri Raz–

Expert in working with vegans and mixed couples (vegans and non-vegans)

Art therapist for children and adults MA

PhD student in Psychoanalysis and Philosophy (Bar-Ilan University)

Individual and couples EFT therapist

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It affects the whole body https://dystonia-dreams.org/it-affects-the-whole-body/ Wed, 02 Oct 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/it-affects-the-whole-body/ Arguably, depression is one of the most misunderstood illnesses that affect human beings. For a long time, you would have struggled to explain to a lot of people that it went beyond feeling a little unhappy or that it was an illness. Over the past decade we have seen a lot of progress, through extensive […]]]>

Arguably, depression is one of the most misunderstood illnesses that affect human beings.

For a long time, you would have struggled to explain to a lot of people that it went beyond feeling a little unhappy or that it was an illness.

Over the past decade we have seen a lot of progress, through extensive re-education, in how the public is encouraged to understand and deal with depression. We were introduced to the idea that depression stems from chemical imbalances in the brain, which can be (to a greater or lesser extent) treated with appropriate medication, in the same way that other illnesses are treated.

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This week, however, a new study published in Psychosomatic medicine discovered that a healthy diet can reduce symptoms associated with depression.

The study, conducted at the University of Manchester, analyzed health data from nearly 46,000 people.

“Making healthier diets can improve people’s moods,” said Joseph Firth, honorary fellow at the University of Manchester.

So what kinds of food aid? It will come as no surprise if we say that less junk food and more vegetables are key.

“Just making simple changes is just as beneficial for mental health,” Firth said.

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“In particular, eating more nutrient-dense meals high in fiber and vegetables while reducing fast foods and refined sugars appears to be enough to avoid the potentially negative psychological effects of a ‘junk food’ diet.

The study had no clear effect on anxiety (only depression), but also found that women had “significantly greater” benefits for their symptoms of depression and anxiety when switching to healthier foods.

It’s not just your diet either. There have been several breakthroughs that demonstrate that depression is not just a disease of the brain, but a disease that affects the whole body.

In 2016, a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry showed a link between depression and certain cardiovascular problems, proving that what might initially come from above, can actually manifest in different ways throughout the body.

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The international team of scientists who conducted the research found that depression causes palpable changes in oxidative stress in the body, decreasing the presence of antioxidants.

And that, therefore, people with depression may be more susceptible to other types of illnesses. Thanks to this new study, it is now suggested that depression should be reclassified as something other than a mental or psychological problem.

It goes to show that one should never underestimate the effect one’s mental state can have on our overall well-being and that everything is interconnected: mind, body and soul.

Don’t worry, because there are many ways to combat depression and anxiety, from sorting out your diet to routine and exercise.

And the study also showed that with the right treatment and drugs, the effects could be almost completely reversed, making patients virtually indistinguishable from their generally “healthy” counterparts.

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