Mental illness – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:00:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dystonia-dreams.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70x70.jpg Mental illness – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ 32 32 Census reveals 2.2 million Australians have been diagnosed with mental illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/census-reveals-2-2-million-australians-have-been-diagnosed-with-mental-illness/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 06:19:43 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/census-reveals-2-2-million-australians-have-been-diagnosed-with-mental-illness/ More than two million Australians have been diagnosed with at least one mental illness, according to the census. According to the latest census results, approximately one in 12 Australians has been diagnosed with a mental illness. According to data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics on Tuesday, more than 8 million Australians suffer from […]]]>

More than two million Australians have been diagnosed with at least one mental illness, according to the census.

According to the latest census results, approximately one in 12 Australians has been diagnosed with a mental illness.

According to data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics on Tuesday, more than 8 million Australians suffer from long-term health conditions, of which 2.2 million suffer from mental illness, in particular.

The 2021 census was the first time we collected information on diagnosed medical conditions, with Australians being asked to disclose whether they had nine different conditions including: arthritis, diabetes, heart attack, asthma , lung or kidney disease, stroke, cancer and mental health .

Mental health issues were the most common response, followed by arthritis (2.1 million) and asthma (2.06 million). However, it should be emphasized that mental illnesses are not a single diagnosis, so a blanket answer is probably not the best way to ascertain the mood of the population.

The figure matches data we already had, which showed calls for mental health resources hit an all-time high last year amid the COVID pandemic and ensuing lockdowns.

ABS statistician Dr David Gruen said the census results on long-term health issues will be key to informing policy and funding for care.

“For the first time, we have data on the long-term health conditions of the entire population,” Gruen said.

“This is essential data to inform planning and service delivery decisions about how treatment and care is delivered to all Australians.”

Jayashri Kulkarni, professor of psychiatry at Alfred Health and Monash University, told the SMH that situational factors like relationship breakdowns and blockages impacted mental health.

“Depression and anxiety disorders in particular seem to have really escalated lately,” she said.

“There are a lot of relationship breakups and life-altering issues. It’s a little different from what we were seeing during the shutdowns, when many people were showing a real sense of panic and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.

As expected, the number of people with long-term health conditions increased with age, with 62.9% of people over 65 reporting at least one condition, while only one in five between the ages of 15 and 35 reported one.

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Hiding in Plain Sight: Youth Mental Illness | The Storm | Episode 1 https://dystonia-dreams.org/hiding-in-plain-sight-youth-mental-illness-the-storm-episode-1/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 01:00:18 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/hiding-in-plain-sight-youth-mental-illness-the-storm-episode-1/ KEN BURNS PRESENTS HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT: YOUTH MENTAL ILLNESS A FILM BY ERIK EWERS AND CHRISTOPHER LOREN EWERS is a production of Florentine Films, Ewers Brothers Productions and WETA…After KEN BURNS PRESENTS HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT: YOUTH MENTAL ILLNESS A FILM BY ERIK EWERS AND CHRISTOPHER LOREN EWERS is a Florentine Films, Ewers Brothers […]]]>

KEN BURNS PRESENTS HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT: YOUTH MENTAL ILLNESS A FILM BY ERIK EWERS AND CHRISTOPHER LOREN EWERS is a production of Florentine Films, Ewers Brothers Productions and WETA…

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Ken Burns and the Ewers Brothers Shine a Light on Youth Mental Illness in New Documentary https://dystonia-dreams.org/ken-burns-and-the-ewers-brothers-shine-a-light-on-youth-mental-illness-in-new-documentary/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 16:42:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/ken-burns-and-the-ewers-brothers-shine-a-light-on-youth-mental-illness-in-new-documentary/ “Hiding in Plain Sight” is a new documentary by Ken Burns about mental illness in young people. Ewers Brothers Youth mental illness has reached crisis levels in America. The percentage of adolescents who have experienced at least one major depressive episode increased by 60 percent from 2007 to 2019. Rates of anxiety, self-harm and suicide […]]]>

Youth mental illness has reached crisis levels in America. The percentage of adolescents who have experienced at least one major depressive episode increased by 60 percent from 2007 to 2019. Rates of anxiety, self-harm and suicide attempts were skyrocketing even before the Covid-19 pandemic, and since then things have only got worse.

Filmmaker Ken Burns has produced a powerful new two-part documentary film on this subject. Hiding in Plain Sight: Youth Mental Illness airs June 27-28 at 9:00 p.m. ET on PBS and will be available to stream on the PBS app. The film was directed and edited by Burns’ longtime colleagues Erik Ewers and Christopher Ewers. It shares the voices of 21 young people from various parts of America who live with mental health issues, tackling issues of stigma, discrimination, awareness and silence.

Hiding in plain sight is part of a larger public media mental health initiative called Welfare. The documentary was screened Wednesday at the White House by First Lady Jill Biden.

“We hope this film will save lives,” Burns says. Stories shared include a 14-year-old boy who struggles with intrusive thoughts and withdraws into his own world, a 15-year-old struggling with addiction, a Native American girl feeling so isolated she contemplates suicide and a transgender teenager suffering from sadness who turns to substance use.

The Ewers brothers have this advice for young people struggling with mental health issues in 2022:

· Talk about that. Talk about that. Talk about that. Talking helps. Talking heals.

· Remember: You’re not alone! We all experience mental health issues in life, all of us. It is part of life and the experience of life.

· Think of mental health as a sliding scale. Some people can get up, brush their teeth, and move on. Others need a helping hand to pick them up. Others need more help moving forward.

· Find your person. In our film, 17-year-old Collin says, “It’s extremely important to find the person who can help you through times like this… They can help you through these difficulties. You are not alone.

· Express yourself. Billie, a 17-year-old transgender girl in our film says, “Don’t be afraid to express yourself and be who you are. Because honestly there aren’t as many people watching as you think… It’s scary to put yourself out there because you expose yourself to others judging you and it opens you up to criticism, but it also opens you up to love. ”

Finally, know this: It’s okay not to be well!

Erik Ewers is the director and editor of Hiding in plain sight. He worked with filmmaker Ken Burns for over 30 years and won a personal Emmy Award. Chris Ewers is the film’s director and cinematographer. He and Erik are co-owners and co-directors of Ewers Brothers Productions, producing feature documentaries in partnership with Ken Burns and Florentine Films.

It was the Ken Burns documentary Civil war, which Erik Ewers saw in 1990 while still at university, which inspired him to become a filmmaker. “I was moved to tears watching the film, which combined old photographs with music and sound effects. It was so real to me and moving. I was overwhelmed,” he recounts. “ At that time, I said to myself that I wanted to do this.” Ewers was surprised to find that Burns lived next door to his aunt and uncle in Walpole, NH. They met, Ewers started an internship almost immediately, and they’ve been working together ever since.

Chris Ewers says he’s wanted to be behind the camera since he was in high school. He studied cinematography at university when digital cinema had not yet been invented. Now it thrives on the collaborative nature of filmmaking.

When it comes to documentary cinema, the Ewers brothers take it very seriously. “We are responsible for someone’s legacy,” says Erik Ewers. “We are responsible for how we portray that person in all aspects of their life and experiences, trials and tribulations, and accomplishments. We must manage it with delicacy and respect.

The biggest challenge the filmmakers had to face Hiding in plain sight established a climate of trust, not only with the interviewees, but also with their families. “They confessed to the world some of their deepest and darkest moments of their lives as they struggled with trauma and mental illness,” says Erik Ewers. “I learned immediately that by sharing my own very real past trauma and mental health issues (I was medicated for anxiety and OCD for 22 years) we were able to find a relationship with one the other. The process of sharing our stories can be extremely cathartic.

Although the Covid-19 pandemic interrupted their directing efforts for several months, the Ewers brothers were still able to complete a high-quality film. “We used the downtime to focus our attention on the film’s script and story structure, which coincidentally allowed us to have laser focus when we were able to resume production,” explains Chris Ewers. “Overall, I like to think the pandemic has brought us closer together and proven to the film industry how resilient we are.”

For people looking to focus on their life purpose, Erik Ewers has this advice. “Keep an eye and an ear open to the things in life that really intrigue you or inspire you and follow that. You can make a career out of what you love. I know that because I did it. Chris Ewers said “We all know the saying ‘love what you do.’ !

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Harbor and Pullman explore mental illness with humor in new London play https://dystonia-dreams.org/harbor-and-pullman-explore-mental-illness-with-humor-in-new-london-play/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:17:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/harbor-and-pullman-explore-mental-illness-with-humor-in-new-london-play/ LONDON, June 23 (Reuters) – ‘Stranger Things’ star David Harbor says his own experiences with mental illness inspired parts of his new London play ‘Mad House,’ a black comedy written by the author acclaimed Theresa Rebeck. The 47-year-old actor, who recently told Britain’s Big Issue magazine he was institutionalized and diagnosed with bipolar disorder aged […]]]>

LONDON, June 23 (Reuters) – ‘Stranger Things’ star David Harbor says his own experiences with mental illness inspired parts of his new London play ‘Mad House,’ a black comedy written by the author acclaimed Theresa Rebeck.

The 47-year-old actor, who recently told Britain’s Big Issue magazine he was institutionalized and diagnosed with bipolar disorder aged 26, said his conversations with the American playwright helped shape the script.

“People talk a lot about wanting to have a conversation about mental illness, but I always feel like the discussions are trivial or about how people with mental illness are freaks and I think that it’s neither of those things,” Harbor told Reuters. of a preview performance.

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“I wanted to have a real expression of what it is because I experienced it myself and so she wrote a piece about the pandemic based on a lot of things that I talked about with her. C It’s really his piece but I definitely brought a part of myself to it, so doing it is a very personal expression for me.”

The play stars Harbor opposite veteran theater and Hollywood actor Bill Pullman, who plays a dying family patriarch.

Harbor plays her son and primary caregiver Michael, who has struggled with mental health issues throughout his life.

With the father’s health fragile, Michael’s sister and brother also return home and the ensuing sibling rivalry, underlying trauma and preparation for his death turn the house into a madhouse.

“What I’m really proud of is that it’s been a really messy discussion of all these issues, namely death and palliative care and caring for someone dying and suffering from illness mental,” Harbor said.

“He does it in a very messy way where there’s no right and wrong and you can just go live with those questions and hopefully you come out of the theater with more questions, deeper questions. “

“Mad House” runs at London’s Ambassadors Theater from June 26 to September 4.

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Reporting by Hanna Rantala, editing by William Maclean

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Glasgow is experiencing a spike in ‘serious and complex mental illness’ since the Covid lockdown https://dystonia-dreams.org/glasgow-is-experiencing-a-spike-in-serious-and-complex-mental-illness-since-the-covid-lockdown/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 16:47:07 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/glasgow-is-experiencing-a-spike-in-serious-and-complex-mental-illness-since-the-covid-lockdown/ Mental health services across Glasgow are seeing an increase in ‘serious and complex illnesses’ after new figures revealed fewer people had been referred during lockdown. A Freedom of Information (FOI) request submitted to NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (GGC) confirms that the number of patients referred to community mental health teams or admitted to an […]]]>

Mental health services across Glasgow are seeing an increase in ‘serious and complex illnesses’ after new figures revealed fewer people had been referred during lockdown.

A Freedom of Information (FOI) request submitted to NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (GGC) confirms that the number of patients referred to community mental health teams or admitted to an inpatient ward fell between 2019 and 2021.

In 2019, 62,176 people were told they needed support from the community team or inpatient department, compared to 49,324 in 2020. The figure rose to 58,196 in 2021 and s stood at 29,087 at the end of April this year.

The NHSGGC say that with fewer people being referred to a mental health service during the pandemic, they are now seeing an increase in the severity and complexity of illness

A spokesperson for NHSGGC said: “Throughout the pandemic, we have made significant adaptations to the provision of mental health services due to an increased need for general health care as a result of Covid- 19.

“An example of this was the creation of two Mental Health Assessment Units, which were set up to provide specialist care and treatment for people facing a mental health crisis. These units reduced the pressure on the emergency services and remained operational after their successful deployment.

“However, our mental health teams have seen an increase in the severity and complexity of illnesses faced by those accessing mental health care, particularly in unscheduled care and adolescent mental health services.”

The spokesperson said the NHS was aware of increased levels of psychological distress in accessing primary care services during the pandemic and that the number of complex cases experts were now dealing with could be caused by the lockdown.

He added: “It [increase in illness] may have been caused directly by impacts associated with the pandemic or, as with other acute illnesses, exacerbated by people delaying access to care during periods of lockdown.

“We have also been aware of the increased levels of psychological distress present among those accessing primary care during the pandemic.

“Providing support for those experiencing mental health issues remains a priority and help is available for those who need it. As always, we urge anyone with mental health issues to seek help through their GP or by phoning NHS24 on 111.”

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FDA Grants Breakthrough Device Designation for VR Treatment of Mental Illnesses https://dystonia-dreams.org/fda-grants-breakthrough-device-designation-for-vr-treatment-of-mental-illnesses/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 06:52:45 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/fda-grants-breakthrough-device-designation-for-vr-treatment-of-mental-illnesses/ Deepak Gopalkrishna, CEO of OxfordVR, said its VR processing has already been tested with Britain’s NHS and the Wounded Warrior Project. OxfordVR A UK startup that uses virtual reality to help deliver cognitive-behavioral therapy has received Breakthrough Device designation from the Food and Drug Administration for its treatment of schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses, […]]]>

A UK startup that uses virtual reality to help deliver cognitive-behavioral therapy has received Breakthrough Device designation from the Food and Drug Administration for its treatment of schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses, a process that will help speed its final approval if clinical trials pan out.

The OxfordVR treatment uses virtual reality headsets to guide patients through everyday situations like going to a store, taking a bus or visiting a doctor’s office, which can cause fear and anxiety in sufferers. of psychosis. The prescription service relies on automated prompts to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a form of talk therapy that attempts to teach skills to manage or modify behavior, over a six-week course.

The FDA’s grant of breakthrough device status will speed up testing and approval of the startup’s VR treatment, for which trials have already been conducted with the US charity Wounded Warrior Project and the National Health Service. from the United Kingdom. A clinical review of the OxfordVR Gamechange treatment published in April by the medical journal The Lancet found it to be effective in treating patients with severe agoraphobia or distress.

“Serious mental illness is a huge problem that cannot be solved with existing approaches alone. It is a huge win for patients and the mental health industry that the FDA recognizes that this technology has the potential to be a more effective way to treat people with some of the toughest mental health issues,” says Deepak Gopalkrishna, CEO and co-founder of OxfordVR.

About 14 million Americans suffer from some form of serious mental illness, and conditions such as schizophrenia spectrum disorders with psychotic symptoms can be among the most severe. While CBT and other forms of talk therapy have been adopted as the preferred treatment method for schizophrenia, many patients still require powerful antipsychotic medications that come with severe side effects to manage delusions and the hallucinations.

Automating this type of therapy session could reduce the burden on oversubscribed mental health services, Gopalkrishna says. “There is a huge unmet need for people with serious mental illness…we are enabling the scale of high-quality care by automating important components of care delivery at very low cost.”

The London-based startup, which has raised more than $24m so far in venture capital, was a spin-off from Oxford University Professor Daniel Freeman’s research into how virtual reality can treat paranoia . The virtual reality-powered sessions have been effective because patients receive treatment in situations tailored to their condition, Gopalkrishna says. “We choose virtual reality because the brain perceives these environments as real and allows us to deploy automated CBT to essentially rewire the brain without needing a therapist present 100% of the time,” he says.

About $5.5 billion was invested in mental health-focused startups last year, according to CB Insights data. The use of virtual reality in medical settings, however, remains nascent outside of trials by OxfordVR, Spanish rivals Amelia Virtual Care and Limbix, as well as the now decades-old application of the technology to treat post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans.

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The Terrifying Simplicity of Eight and the Exploration of Mental Illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/the-terrifying-simplicity-of-eight-and-the-exploration-of-mental-illness/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 19:45:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/the-terrifying-simplicity-of-eight-and-the-exploration-of-mental-illness/ Eight is an Australian low-budget drama film written and directed by Peter Blackburn in what is still its only characteristic. It remains fairly obscure, but at the time of its release in 2016, it received some attention from various film festivals. Its obscurity, however, is unfair as it offers a unique and extremely realistic look […]]]>

Eight is an Australian low-budget drama film written and directed by Peter Blackburn in what is still its only characteristic. It remains fairly obscure, but at the time of its release in 2016, it received some attention from various film festivals. Its obscurity, however, is unfair as it offers a unique and extremely realistic look into a woman’s crippling mental health. Shot in one riveting take, the result is eighty-one anxious and stressful minutes. A huge factor in the film’s effectiveness is its simplicity – there’s little dialogue, mostly one person onscreen the entire time, and takes place in one location. The plot follows Sarah Prentice (Libby Munro) just trying to leave her house, but unbearable OCD and anxiety keep her from doing so. The title comes from Sarah’s compulsion to do everything in eight – whether that’s eight kicks before she puts her shoes on, or eight clicks of the door before she opens it. She is held captive in her home by her own mind, and what makes Blackburn’s dramatization of Sarah’s story so effective is the way it borrows from the horror genre.

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The opening shot sees the camera pan up to an awake Sarah in her bed staring at the ceiling as her alarm clock rings. Camera movements are deliberately slow to match his wariness. Everything she does – except washing her hands or scrubbing surfaces – is done meticulously. However, each time she cleans up, it’s frantic and desperate, demonstrating one of her greatest fears in her condition. The film mimics Sarah’s feelings about the audience with its almost constant intensity, even when it can seem like very little is happening. Even when her panic seems to come out of nowhere, when her breathing goes from normal to rapid, it’s hard not to mimic that, especially for those who’ve been in a similar position to her in their lives. It’s the sudden tilt to its fall and the ups and downs it goes through that keeps the tension high. Much of the film recalls the hallway scene in the brilliant. Every time Sarah turns a corner, it feels like something awful awaits her. It’s the kind of tension the film manages to maintain every time she moves through the house.


The normal-looking house becomes claustrophobic and unwelcoming as Sarah sneaks in with extreme caution. The camera follows her closely, causing an overpowering and uncomfortable atmosphere throughout. It has the aesthetic of a haunted house horror with dark, shadowy corners and limited lighting. Essentially, it’s a haunted house movie without any ghosts because the real horror is much more authentic and in plain sight. Because there’s not much dialogue – especially in the first half – every sound is heightened. We hear every friction of her teeth-grinding hands as she washes them and it can be painful to bear. This is most evident in the first half of the film, and while it gets awkward, that’s exactly the effect Blackburn wanted to create.

The second half of the film features more dialogue and further develops the central character through interactions with others. These include her daughter, her husband, a therapist and a delivery man. A series of sporadic voicemails are left to gradually reveal more about Sarah’s life, and there is an eerie, transcendent impression left by some of these voicemails. It’s as if these are Sarah’s audible thoughts as she struggles with her inner guilt and fear. Blackburn is capable of creating terror out of things that most people wouldn’t question for a second. In addition to the voicemails, Sarah is deeply annoyed by the laughter of schoolchildren coming from outside her window, and there are frequent knocks on her door that sound deceptively aggressive.


You could say that the film is plotless and doesn’t tell a story so much, but rather demonstrates an in-depth study of a character. As it’s only an hour and a half in the life of Sarah, Blackburn cleverly lets the audience piece together what’s already happened in her life, and there are plenty of unseen characters playing pivotal roles. Sarah’s daughter and husband are heard on the phone and on the other side of her door in some of the film’s toughest scenes. Sarah’s devastating longing shows a tragic side to mental illness that can cause families to break apart. By keeping them off-screen and not revealing too much about them, Blackburn keeps the focus on Sarah, and we see how haunted she is by her previous life as a wife and mother. The guilt she feels as her daughter begs to see her is shown in a scene where she slumps against the door and collapses.


Munro’s performance elevates the tension and discomfort sought by the film. She creates such a likeable character in Sarah, and most importantly, she doesn’t over-act at all. Her brilliance in this role is amplified by the film’s documentary approach. It’s like a hidden camera is following her, and that on-the-fly perspective makes the film all the more raw and disturbing. His conclusion seems appropriate and justified as well. He doesn’t pretend it’s something that can be solved quickly without any difficulty, and while Sarah’s journey isn’t over by the end of the film, he leans towards something hopeful for her in the future.

Eight is a chilling look at a condition that is not talked about or understood enough. It’s as horrifying as it is heartbreaking, but it plays its part in successfully dramatizing a day in Sarah’s life. While not an easy watch – nor enjoyable – it’s essential viewing and reminds everyone how the dark side of life can be so simple, yet so terrifying. By scattering in the ashes of horror, Blackburn ensures that this drama is told in the most heartfelt and painful way. Combined with an engaged and flawless performance from Munro, there are few explorations of mental health that are more frightening or heartbreaking.


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My Brother’s Girlfriend Has Mental Illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/my-brothers-girlfriend-has-mental-illness/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 10:11:25 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/my-brothers-girlfriend-has-mental-illness/ Dear Stavroula, I have a twin brother and we are very close to each other and since we were children we tell each other everything. We now live and work in different cities, but this does not affect our communication. Recently my brother started a relationship with a woman and he is very much in […]]]>

Dear Stavroula,

I have a twin brother and we are very close to each other and since we were children we tell each other everything. We now live and work in different cities, but this does not affect our communication. Recently my brother started a relationship with a woman and he is very much in love with her. He does not stop talking about her, admiring her, not paying attention to the time regarding the formalization of the relationship. And me, when I met her, I found her very nice. But I spoke to a friend who knew her, and she told me that in their town everyone knew that the girl’s mother had a serious mental illness and that she probably had it herself, because she had learned that she was taking psychotropic drugs. I haven’t said anything to my brother, partly because he’s on a little cloud, and partly because it’s his first real relationship. When I tried to ask him generally and vaguely, I realized he had no idea. I’m in a dilemma whether to tell my brother. On the one hand, I wouldn’t want to spoil his joy, but on the other hand what if he commits himself to this girl and is faced with a very difficult situation? What would you advise?

Marianthi

Dear Marianthi,

Although in recent years we have begun to discuss many issues such as sexual choices more and more openly, the issue of mental health continues to remain a social taboo, despite the fact that today more and more people suffer from mental illness, especially after the recent pandemic.

Although more and more people appreciate the need and the role of the psychologist, the words “psychiatrist” and “psychotropic” remain negatively charged. The result is that people with mental illness are afraid to talk about it for fear of losing their job, partner or friends. And that can unfortunately happen, as long as logic, knowledge and respect for diversity do not prevail.

Maybe this fear prevents your brother’s girlfriend from telling him about his illness, if she really hasn’t already and if she really suffers from something and it’s not all rumors that often go around unchecked in small towns.

To find the answer to what’s on your mind, it can help to think about two things.

First, if the woman is really suffering from a mental illness and your brother doesn’t understand something, it means that she can control the situation and is functional in her life and relationships and there is no therefore perhaps no reason to worry.

If he knows about it and hasn’t told you about it, it probably means he doesn’t want to be influenced in his decisions about the relationship. As you write to me, this is his first serious relationship and he is happy with it.

Today, mental illnesses are mostly cured or at least, with systematic treatment, people who suffer from them can live normal lives and enjoy it with those they love. What creates difficulties is ignorance and misunderstandings on these issues.

Stavroula Tsoutsa is a Certified Holistic Professional Life Coach, ICF ACC, Certified Heartmath Coach/Mentor and Trainer, and Certified Points of You Practitioner.

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Amber Heard and Britney Spears highlight the stigma of women’s mental illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/amber-heard-and-britney-spears-highlight-the-stigma-of-womens-mental-illness/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 18:20:19 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/amber-heard-and-britney-spears-highlight-the-stigma-of-womens-mental-illness/ The mental health of prominent women has been the subject of particularly blatant public slander and scrutiny. This spring, millions of viewers online watched a weeks-long defamation lawsuit between Amber Heard and her former husband Johnny Depp. The lawsuit was used as fodder for social media posts that sought to portray Heard as “unstable”, and […]]]>

The mental health of prominent women has been the subject of particularly blatant public slander and scrutiny. This spring, millions of viewers online watched a weeks-long defamation lawsuit between Amber Heard and her former husband Johnny Depp. The lawsuit was used as fodder for social media posts that sought to portray Heard as “unstable”, and it included direct speculation about his mental health by a forensic psychologist called in by Depp’s team. The outcome of the case did not matter. When it comes to stigma and career, the costs and damages to a woman weigh heavily if she is labeled with a mental illness and cannot be undone.

Women face widespread prejudice, discrimination and unrealistic expectations, even when it comes to their emotional well-being. They should be seen as holding everything together. They must succeed in their careers, maintain their sympathy, serve as doting mothers, etc., while performing their work more competently. and modesty than their male counterparts. Actresses, singers and other celebrities carry the added burden of societal prescriptions to be simultaneously sexy and innocent. This link is impossible to negotiate and it comes with significant mental health costs.

Society can easily weaponize the mental well-being of high-profile women, as Heard’s case shows. In other cases, this control has even cost some women their basic autonomy. Take the example of the iconic pop star Britney Spears. Images of a “crazy” Spears first surfaced more than 15 years ago when she grabbed a pair of clippers from a beauty salon and shaved her head in full view of the paparazzi. Sensationalist criticism followed: could she no longer practice her profession, parent her children or manage her own finances? Had she completely lost her mental capacity? A court commissioner quickly placed her under guardianship led by her father, James Spears, and it wasn’t until late 2021 that a judge freed her from that grip. The idea that a 40-year-old multi-millionaire professional couldn’t manage her personal affairs (including her own reproductive rights) seems completely wrong.

Other female celebrities have come under fire for their mental health issues. After pop star Selena Gomez shared her experiences with depression and panic attacks, members of the media laughed at her and commented on the cruelty she faced. Singer and actress Lady Gaga championed mental health rights sharing her own struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder, noting that coming out of her mental health issues was a controversial experience that exposed her to the public eye. Mental health diagnoses are still heavily laden with deep-rooted stigma, even though severe clinical disorders are common and many people successfully recover or manage them.

Coverage of women’s mental health stands in stark contrast to how famous men are portrayed in the media. Kanye West suffers from bipolar disorder and Jim Carrey suffered from depression, and no judge put them under conservatorship. Sometimes these men even received praise for how their mental illness set them apart from other artists. Pop culture has sometimes romanticized the mental illnesses of male painters, novelists, and composers, from Ernest Hemingway to David Foster Wallace, as central to their genius. Female celebrities face a different reality: they must meet the impossible expectations of needing to be compassionate and competitive while transparently projecting a sexual personality. The resulting internalization and feeling of helplessness can only harm mental health. One of us (Hinshaw) clearly explained this case in The triple bond.

Raising awareness of the mental health struggles of a high-profile woman perpetuates the idea that she is inadequate and incompetent, and that these shortcomings affect their craft. This fundamentally devalues ​​and stigmatizes her. Importantly, society and the courts continue to perceive women as unreliable reporterstoo dramatic, less competent and less “logical” than men.

Despite increased public awareness of mental illness, stigma remains strong, especially for women. As Hinshaw argued in The mark of shame and Another form of madness, many people denigrate behaviors perceived as irrational, and this is particularly the case for women. After all, if unpopular or “deviant” behaviors are the product of mental illness, then any social or political value they convey must, by definition, be irrational and discountable.

Women with mental health issues are more likely than men to experience ‘self-stigma’— internalizing the idea that they are flawed and not deserving of evidence-based treatment. These biases start early. Adolescent girls are subjected to a cascade of simultaneous and often contradictory stressors, a real unreasonable link high expectations.

Is it any surprise that rates of binge eating, depression, anxiety, suicide attempts, and non-suicidal self-harm (cutting) continue to rise, especially among teenage girls and women? Discussions about mental health stigma have increased over the past few years, and one of us (Gruber) has launched a free online course called #talkmentalillness to fight it. But not enough attention has been paid to how this stigma interacts with gender. Are girls and women paying a higher price, losing more opportunities and even freedoms in their professional and personal lives? Too often, these issues are viewed as a personal weakness or female “attention seeking” rather than a matter of clinical and public health concern.

Society’s fascination with women’s mental health issues – and the shocking losses of personal and professional freedoms and reputational damage that some women have suffered as a result – should open our eyes to the lingering stigma and burden of mental illness for girls and women. It is time for discussions around mental health stigma to acknowledge and address this double standard so that women and girls can get the support and treatment they need without fear that their lives will be destroyed if they do. .

This is an opinion and analytical article, and the opinions expressed by the author or authors are not necessarily those of American scientist.

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Opinion: Mental illness does not cause mass shootings. Mass shootings cause mental illness. Austin therapists expose Gov. Greg Abbott’s abysmal record of supporting access to mental health and education – Chronicles https://dystonia-dreams.org/opinion-mental-illness-does-not-cause-mass-shootings-mass-shootings-cause-mental-illness-austin-therapists-expose-gov-greg-abbotts-abysmal-record-of-supporting-access-to-mental-health-and-educa/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 16:56:47 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/opinion-mental-illness-does-not-cause-mass-shootings-mass-shootings-cause-mental-illness-austin-therapists-expose-gov-greg-abbotts-abysmal-record-of-supporting-access-to-mental-health-and-educa/ Dear Governor Abbott, You said, “Anyone who shoots someone else has a mental health issue. Period.” As mental health professionals in Austin, we are outraged that you blamed the shooter’s mental health for the massacre of 21 people. According to a National Library of Medicine study, people with mental illness are more likely to be […]]]>

Dear Governor Abbott,

You said, “Anyone who shoots someone else has a mental health issue. Period.”

As mental health professionals in Austin, we are outraged that you blamed the shooter’s mental health for the massacre of 21 people. According to a National Library of Medicine study, people with mental illness are more likely to be the victim of a violent crime than the perpetrator. Your statement further stigmatizes mental illness.

Your administration has an abysmal record of supporting access to mental health. Texas ranks last nationally for access to mental health care according to the 2021 State of Mental Health in America report. Access to care is often limited by access to affordable insurance, quality treatment, special education, and time off to seek services.

In April, you transferred $211 million from the Texas Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which oversees mental health programs, to Border Security. HHS says the money was replaced with the same amount of CARES funding, but that funding is intended to provide economic relief to those impacted by COVID. COVID has severely affected small communities like Uvalde.

We therapists know that mental illness, although sometimes genetic, is more often the consequence of environmental conditions within the family and society. A mass shooter is a symptom of societal fractures such as poverty. Poverty – in the form of hunger, substandard housing, non-existent preschools and substandard public schools – hurts children. Texas Rankings sixth in child hunger. The child poverty rate is 19%. One-Third of Texas Working Families live 200% below the poverty line. Under your leadership, in 2015 the state refused to expand Medicaid, withholding $1 billion in federal funds that would have provided many Texans with access to medical care, including mental health.

Schools offer the best chance of identifying emotional vulnerability and providing counselling. Texas ranks 44th in school funding per child. A school district’s emotional wellness counselor typically travels between four schools.

We 100% support strengthening mental health funding, services, and access in Texas. But let’s be clear: Your administration’s gun policies, which make it easier to buy and carry a gun, are the primary reason 21 people died. Last year, just two years after the mass shooting in El Paso, you pushed for “constitutional carry,” allowing anyone 21 or older to carry a handgun without a license or training, despite 60% of Texans opposed such permissiveness. The sole purpose of AR-15s is to brutally kill large numbers of people. They have been the weapon in almost every mass shooting. Yet Texas refuses to limit their availability to people as young as 18, an age when the brain’s executive decision-making is not fully developed. 18 year olds are not allowed to drink but they can buy AR-15s! All Salvador Ramos had to do was turn 18 and walk into a gun store and show proof of age.

Under your governorship, child gun deaths have doubled, from 54 in 2015 to 146 in 2020. Our gun laws, combined with our lack of mental health support, have created the fields of the deaths of Uvalde, El Paso, Santa Fe and Sunderland Springs. No child feels safe.

That an 18-year-old can buy AR-15s and 1,600 rounds tells our kids that we’re willing to sacrifice them, that we appreciate the right to own a gun with far less oversight than we have need to drive a car on their right to a future. “Hardening” our schools into armed fortresses is not the solution. Work for bipartisan legislation that creates sensible regulations for owning and using firearms. It is essential that we keep AR-15s and all other assault weapons out of reach of people under 21. Create a red flag law.

And significantly fund mental health services.


This editorial was written by Austin-area therapists, both licensed professional counselors and social workers: Emily Adler, LMSW; Corinne Arles, LPC; Whitney Bradley, LMF-A; Lee Ann Cameron, PLC, SEP; Jennifer Carley, LMSW; Stacey Cholick, MA, LPC; Stacy Covington, PLC; Siobhan Florek, LCSW; Kathryn Gates, LMFT; Rachel Ladov, LCSW; Leila Levinson, LCSW, JD, LMSW; Eva Lorini, PLC; Melanie Mahanger, MA, LPC; Lisa McCafferty, MA, CCN, PLC; Vanessa McNamara, LMFT, PLC; Pat Morgan, PLC; Stacy Nakell, LCSW, CGP; John Perry, LCSW; Jordana Raiskin, LCSW; Cynthia Schiebel, MEd, LPC-S, LCDC; Teri Schroeder, LCSW; William Schroeder, MA, PLC; Shaina Singh, LCSW; Emily Stone, Ph.D., LMFT-S; Monrovia van Hoose, LCSW; Roxanne Watson, PLC; Nora Zaizar, MEd, LPC; and Michelle Zadrozny, LCSW-S, EAS-C.

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