Mental illness – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 01:18:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dystonia-dreams.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70x70.jpg Mental illness – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ 32 32 Feds review treatment for adults with mental illness in Oklahoma https://dystonia-dreams.org/feds-review-treatment-for-adults-with-mental-illness-in-oklahoma/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 12:41:22 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/feds-review-treatment-for-adults-with-mental-illness-in-oklahoma/ OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A civil rights investigation into the treatment of people with mental illnesses by police in Oklahoma, Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City State was announced Thursday by the U.S. Department of Justice. “We will determine whether the state discriminates against adults with mental illness in Oklahoma County,” where Oklahoma City is located, […]]]>

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A civil rights investigation into the treatment of people with mental illnesses by police in Oklahoma, Oklahoma City and Oklahoma City State was announced Thursday by the U.S. Department of Justice.

“We will determine whether the state discriminates against adults with mental illness in Oklahoma County,” where Oklahoma City is located, in violation of federal law “by relying on institutional frameworks to serve adults when they could be in the community,” the deputy attorney general said. said Kristen Clarke.

Clarke of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division said the investigation in Oklahoma is part of similar investigations that include Minneapolis; Phoenix; Louisville, Kentucky; and the states of Kentucky, Missouri and South Carolina.

The investigations are part of the Civil Rights Division’s efforts to apply more aggressively a 1999 U.S. Supreme Court decision to ensure people with disabilities are not unnecessarily isolated when receiving government assistance.

The agency launched the initiative under the Obama administration and the Justice Department, under Attorney General Merrick Garland, pledged to prioritize civil rights cases to ensure equal access and justice under the law.

In addition to in-depth investigations of police practices in several major cities, the department examines prison conditions in several states and examines conditions in mental health facilities.

Oklahoma “will fully cooperate with the Justice Department’s investigation,” according to a statement from Kate Vesper, spokeswoman for Governor Kevin Stitt.

Oklahoma City Police Chief Wade Gourley said in a statement that the department learned Thursday morning of the investigation into the department’s response to calls involving people with mental illness or behavioral issues.

“We intend to cooperate with the USDOJ and look forward to working with them to provide the most secure and efficient means of responding to these types of calls,” Gourley said.

An Oklahoma City spokesperson said a statement would be released later Thursday.

A senior Justice Department official, who is not authorized to comment publicly, said the investigation was prompted by complaints from a mental health advocacy organization, but did not identify the organization.

Two of the state’s largest mental health advocacy organizations, the National Alliance on Mental Illness-Oklahoma and the Alliance of Mental Health Providers of Oklahoma, did not immediately return phone calls for comment.

The official said the investigation did not target the troubled Oklahoma County Jail or the city’s fatal police shootings, but both could be implicated if violations of the rights of people with mental illnesses are uncovered.

“We will look at police encounters with people with mental health issues, if fatal shootings by police are part of these encounters they will be investigated,” as will the treatment of detainees with mental health issues. mental illnesses, the official said.

“The investigation will examine whether Oklahoma is not providing community mental health services” that include treatment, housing and employment, Clarke said.

Investigators will also look at the city’s response to 911 calls about mentally disabled adults and whether police are complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Clarke said.

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Schenectady’s Mohawk Opportunities educates about mental illness and homelessness https://dystonia-dreams.org/schenectadys-mohawk-opportunities-educates-about-mental-illness-and-homelessness/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 04:39:18 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/schenectadys-mohawk-opportunities-educates-about-mental-illness-and-homelessness/ SCHENECTADY – Mohawk Opportunities, Inc. is on a mission to raise awareness about mental illness through education and transparency of their mission, according to the nonprofit group’s executive director. “I think once that happens, people who feel the stigma can take the risk and engage in treatment because there’s more acceptance about it in the […]]]>

SCHENECTADY – Mohawk Opportunities, Inc. is on a mission to raise awareness about mental illness through education and transparency of their mission, according to the nonprofit group’s executive director.

“I think once that happens, people who feel the stigma can take the risk and engage in treatment because there’s more acceptance about it in the community,” said Steve Klein, the organization’s executive director, about the Schenectady-based organization that was founded in 1985. “If we can also raise funds through this from people who become sensitive and supportive of our mission, that would be great.”

Klein said when he took over in the summer of 2021, the board also tasked him with growing the agency, expanding services to meet increased demand, and formulating a plan “ forward thinking that could take the organization to the next level.”

“The primary mission of Mohawk Opportunities is to provide support and services to people with mental illness to help them recover and achieve stability and happiness in their lives,” he said.

Mohawk Opportunities, Inc.

  • 201 Nott Terrace, Schenectady
  • 518-374-8424


A big part of that, Klein said, is finding homeless people a safe place to live and thrive until they can live independently.

“Once someone is stable in housing, and we helped them through treatment, making sure they take their medication, they become a kind of ordinary person,” he said. he adds.

In some cases, an upsetting or traumatic event can cause a person to stop taking their medication, allowing their mental illness to manifest.

“Trauma is a very important area that we study and train our staff to understand the impact of trauma on people’s behaviors and mental illness, and then there are also biological and chemical imbalances in the brain,” did he declare.

Klein said serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolarity, depression and personality disorders are “disorders of the mind” that “make the world different for them because of their brain chemistry” .

A large number of people struggling with mental illness are also drug and/or alcohol addicts and are homeless, he said.

People seeking help for a mental illness can contact the office directly to find out what services are available. Mohawk also receives referrals from county and non-profit groups that help the homeless or those struggling with addiction.

With a projected operating budget of $10.5 million for next year, Mohawk has nearly 100 staff ranging from psychiatrists to nurses to social workers at sites in Schenectady which houses an outpatient facility and administrative offices as well as four group homes serving 43 people, all located within a five-minute drive of the Electric City offices.

One of the residences is a crisis residence that can accommodate a dozen people, for people coming out of homelessness or prison who often require more intensive care and services. Klein said the COVID-19 pandemic has led to more people seeking their services.

“There is this perfect storm of increased need, more people needing the services because either they are experiencing mental illness for the first time or their mental illness has been exacerbated by the stress of the pandemic,” did he declare.

At the same time, there are fewer clinicians and fewer patient beds, the latter due to staffing shortages.

“We try to really support our staff, not just financially, but we do a lot of agency events as perks for our staff,” he said, adding that once a month he delivers breakfast. breakfast, lunch and dinner to employees and customers. .

In late October, Mohawk hosted an Employee Appreciation Day with pancake breakfast.

“We do our best to make our staff feel really good about their jobs, feel like part of a team, feel part of the organization, and that’s part of what we call our caring culture,” said said Klein, adding that they serve more than 500 customers a year.

The group is working with a property development company and is looking for a suitable location for what will be 16 new homes. Once construction is complete, a state grant of $400,000 will help cover the cost of providing services to occupants of the new residences.

Through a special federal grant, Mohawk also provides housing subsidies to people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS and their families.

Klein said one of the ambitious long-term goals is for the organization to open a state-of-the-art behavioral health care center that would be accessible to community groups helping people with mental illness who would be disabled and accessible. to people with disabilities.

While it also hopes to do more fundraising, the group relies heavily on federal funding, including Mediacid and HUD, which is supplemented by state and county money.

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Clarice Gallegos of Focus Clubhouse – Helping Adults with Mental Illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/clarice-gallegos-of-focus-clubhouse-helping-adults-with-mental-illness/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 17:01:48 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/clarice-gallegos-of-focus-clubhouse-helping-adults-with-mental-illness/ Podcast: Play in new window | To download (Duration: 47:14 — 64.9 MB) Subscribe: Google Podcasts | | After Clarice Gallegos, Executive Director of Focus Clubhouse Lafayette, joined Discover Lafayette to discuss its mission to help people with mental illness have a reason to get up in the morning, be surrounded by like-minded people and […]]]>

Clarice Gallegos, Executive Director of Focus Clubhouse Lafayette, joined Discover Lafayette to discuss its mission to help people with mental illness have a reason to get up in the morning, be surrounded by like-minded people and to have meaningful work to do.

Focus Clubhouse is a free membership community for people 18 and older that provides a non-clinical, safe and enjoyable environment for people with diagnosed mental illness. Members have opportunities for work, education, housing, welfare and friendship and a chance to thrive with the support of their peers.

Many adults with serious mental illnesses experience repeated mental health crises resulting in frequent hospitalizations and encounters with law enforcement. Clarice struggled for years in her relationship with her son, Brian Boswell, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. He had no real business skills, was homeless, in and out of shelters, and twice threatened to kill himself.

It was in Miami that Brian found the Clubhouse role model and it was there that he “finally felt he had a sense of self and fit in”. He began to turn his life around with the help of the Key Clubhouse during the five years he was affiliated with the chapter. Now 48, Brian returned to Louisiana several years ago and encouraged Clarice to help him start a local Clubhouse chapter. the Lafayette chapter is the only such Clubhouse in Louisiana.

Brian Boswell pictured with his mother, Clarice Gallegos. Brian moved back to Louisiana in 2016 and when he couldn’t find a local clubhouse, he said, “I’m going to start one!” Incorporated in July 2018, Focus Clubhouse has approximately 20 active members, with 5-7 active participants daily. Clarice says, “Once you are a member, you are always a member.

The power of the Clubhouse International model lies in its effectiveness in keeping members out of crisis and on the road to recovery. The Clubhouse model began in 1948 in New York and is currently used successfully in over 300 locations in 30 countries around the world. It offers a proven method of psychiatric rehabilitation in a non-clinical setting.

“Coming to the Clubhouse you receive love and understanding, you gain purpose, people push you to believe in yourself, and you know anything is possible. We say Grace every day at the Clubhouse because we are grateful to the One who allowed us to be supported.

Focus Clubhouse is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Members get lunch for $2.00, but Clarice points out that if money is an issue, there is no charge. Tasks such as sweeping, grading and preparing lunch are handled by the members alongside Clarice. Clarice is the rock of the organization, being there every day and keeping the Clubhouse running smoothly.

Volunteers are encouraged as well as monetary contributions. Focus Clubhouse is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, so all donations are tax deductible. It costs around $50 per day to support a member. For as little as $25 you can provide lunch for a member for two weeks. To learn more about how you can help, please visit https://focusclubhouse.org/get-involved/

Focus Clubhouse is proud to have moved to its new, larger location at 1609 Johnston Street near UL-Lafayette to better serve its members.

We thank Clarice Gallegos for her heart and dedication to helping people who just need a break and a place to fit in. May God bless her and the members of the Focus Clubhouse.

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Teens and young adults are self-diagnosing their mental illness on TikTok. What could go wrong? https://dystonia-dreams.org/teens-and-young-adults-are-self-diagnosing-their-mental-illness-on-tiktok-what-could-go-wrong/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:50:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/teens-and-young-adults-are-self-diagnosing-their-mental-illness-on-tiktok-what-could-go-wrong/ “I love it when people say you don’t have ADHD,” @KatieSueHue says in a video, giving her audience a “we know better” look. As she dances to happy music, her list of ADHD symptoms flashes across the screen: “It’s going to be bubbly, dull, and offbeat.” “Relive every conversation I’ve had and regret what I […]]]>

“I love it when people say you don’t have ADHD,” @KatieSueHue says in a video, giving her audience a “we know better” look.

As she dances to happy music, her list of ADHD symptoms flashes across the screen: “It’s going to be bubbly, dull, and offbeat.” “Relive every conversation I’ve had and regret what I said.” “New hyperfixes every month.”

By early November, the video had 1.7 million likes, including Smith. “That sounds like what I’m dealing with,” Smith thought.

Like the country intense mental health crisis meet a shortage of mental health care providers — and TikTok is digging deeper and deeper into our lives — experts worry that vulnerable people with real disease are being dragged down sometimes destructive paths, and that even many who aren’t sick are being seduced into thinking they are.

It’s easy to think of TikTok as just a platform for short, lighthearted dance videos or viral syncs or cinnamon challenges.

But over time, its algorithm has become famous for figuring out what users are interested in, then relentlessly pushing video after video on the topic – a practice that sends people “deep down rabbit holes of hard-to-escape content”, according to a 2021 Wall Street Journal survey.

A TikTok spokeswoman pointed the Globe to a blog post on the subject which says the company is “testing ways to avoid recommending a series of similar content – such as extreme diets or fitness, sadness or breakups…”

On the plus side, TikTok videos (or posts on other social media sites) can give people insight into themselves and inspire them to seek professional help, experts say. If you look for it, it’s even possible to find content from real mental health experts, and all this attention to mental health shines a light on what was once a taboo subject.

But too often, experts say, suggestible people confuse one or two symptoms with the disorder itself.

“If I were to go through the DSM” – the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – “and take a little snapshot of every diagnosis, we would all be linked and self-diagnosed,” said Alex Chinks, a registered clinical psychologist at Needham. . “A symptom of depression is fatigue. Well, I was tired all week.

Corey Basch, professor of public health at William Paterson University, recently conducted a study that looked at 100 TikTok videos with the hashtag #mentalhealth. Collectively, the videos have garnered more than a billion views, but the volume and intensity of the comments is even more astonishing — and extremely concerning — she said.

In a cut video that suggested instead slap with a rubber band and spraying your wrist with red paint to mimic blood, for example, the commenters were grateful for the suggestion.

“I wish someone would jump on it and say, ‘I’m a mental health professional, and when my patients want to cut themselves, we look for ways to identify more adaptive behaviors in times of distress,'” said Basch.

In videos about a scenario in which a particular person gets you down, she says, “an army comes to the comments section to validate. “This person is toxic or horrible,” even if the person is his mother. »

To go to TikTok and search for mental health disorders is to find yourself in a world with seemingly endless seductive videos. They’re mostly hosted by random strangers and people with enough followers to be known as “influencers”, who detail symptoms as they dance or roar for the camera, and Adele or the latest viral hit plays backwards. -plan.

Here is a like #Autism: “Things I didn’t know were my autistic traits,” reads the on-screen message, as a telegenic woman moves to the music and bats her false eyelashes.

“Listen to the same song over and over!” is a sign of autism, viewers learn with a smile. “Struggling to respond to messages” is another.

Some of the symptoms detailed in the mental health videos — including listening to a song on repeat or having trouble responding to a message — are almost absurdly general. But people trying to figure themselves out might find that a “light bulb goes out for them, even if it doesn’t completely provide the answer,” said Lovern Moseley, a psychologist at Boston Medical Center.

“People want to feel like they’re part of a community, or they’re looking for something to explain why they don’t fit in or behave in a certain way.”

Indeed, Deborah Offner, a clinical psychologist at Newton, recently treated a college student who struggled with feelings of insecurity and vulnerability and who “learned” from TikTok that she had an “anxious attachment style,” said. offend.

But there was no evidence of ‘anxious attachment’ – which is a clinical categorization based on the nature of a child’s early attachments to caregivers, said Offner, author of the next study. “Educators as First Responders”, a teacher’s guide to adolescent development and mental health.

“In my opinion, she was just sick of connecting with people at parties and having them walk past her the next day like they didn’t know her.”

TikTok self-diagnoses can be harmful because they can trick people into giving themselves inaccurate labels, said Jessica Brunner, a licensed clinical social worker.

“That’s not a good way to go through life,” she said. “It can completely change the way someone thinks about themselves. “Hello, my name is TOC” or “Hello, my name is depression”.

In an emailed statement to The Globe, a TikTok spokeswoman said: “We care deeply about the well-being of our community, which is why we continue to invest in digital literacy education aimed at to help people evaluate and understand the content they interact with. on line. We strongly encourage individuals to consult a professional physician if they need assistance.

Smith, the woman who suspects she might have ADHD, made an appointment to discuss it with her doctor. But regardless of professional diagnoses, TikTok’s algorithm has already spoken.

“I just got an ad for an app where I can pay $80 a month for some kind of [ADHD] evaluation,” she said.

If you or a loved one need help, the Commonwealth maintains a list of emergency numbers (https://www.mass.gov/service-details/crisis-hotlines).


Beth Teitell can be contacted at beth.teitell@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @bethteitell.

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Antidepressants are my grandfather’s legacy. But with mental illness, they’re not enough https://dystonia-dreams.org/antidepressants-are-my-grandfathers-legacy-but-with-mental-illness-theyre-not-enough/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 10:02:01 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/antidepressants-are-my-grandfathers-legacy-but-with-mental-illness-theyre-not-enough/ My grandfather, Harry Salzer, was a psychiatrist in Cincinnati who, with his colleague Max Lurie, reported in a 1953 article that isoniazid – a drug developed to treat tuberculosis – had a positive impact on two-thirds of their depressed patients. It was the for the first time, researchers had identified a drug with so-called antidepressant […]]]>

My grandfather, Harry Salzer, was a psychiatrist in Cincinnati who, with his colleague Max Lurie, reported in a 1953 article that isoniazid – a drug developed to treat tuberculosis – had a positive impact on two-thirds of their depressed patients.

It was the for the first time, researchers had identified a drug with so-called antidepressant effects. With this, a new era in psychiatric treatment was born.

Growing up, I knew my grandfather was a psychiatrist. But I didn’t know he had published scientific papers until I started my own training in clinical psychology. While researching treatments for a patient with panic attacks and poor diet, I came across my grandfather’s studies in which he claimed that low blood sugar could be the basis of certain psychiatric conditions. About 10 years ago I found his 1953 article on antidepressants. It was a shocking revelation.

The 1953 discovery was consistent with a growing belief that mental illnesses are rooted in biology, leading to 70 years of efforts to identify these causes and drugs to address them. The optimism underlying these ideas was so great that the 1990s were declared “decade of the brainby then-President George Bush in anticipation of discoveries identifying the genetic and brain mechanisms associated with mental disorders, and the development of drugs to cure them.

But the 1990s are now well behind us and we are far from the expected remedies.

So maybe it’s time to broaden our thinking about the causes and cures of depression and other mental illnesses. Focusing primarily on treatments that target the biological underpinnings of mental illness might not be the best idea?

How to find help

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, help is available 24/7:

Thomas Insel, former director of the National Institute of Mental Health – the federal agency that funded much of this research – said recently asked a similar question. Despite all the agency’s attention to genetics and brain chemicals that can cause mental illnesses, there are still too many people with these illnesses who need more immediate help. In a recent book, Insel talks about a man who talked about his son with schizophrenia, who told Insel, “Our house is on fire and you’re talking about the chemistry of paint. What are you doing to put out this fire?

The man is right.

Millions of Americans take antidepressantsand their usage has increased in recent years. Many swear that escitalopram (brand name: Lexapro) or sertraline (Zoloft) have changed their lives, and I would never suggest anyone stop taking their antidepressants without a long conversation with their prescriber. But research has generally not been supportive of my grandfather’s notion that antidepressants are a panacea that targets the biological roots of mental illness.

Research has generally been hostile to my grandfather’s notion that antidepressants are a panacea.

Several clinicians and researchers have proposed that most of the positive impacts of antidepressants at least result in part from the placebo effect – that is, people feel better because they took a pill that they expect to help them, whether or not the pill targets the desired brain mechanisms. Today’s antidepressants often work by helping to increase serotonin levels in the brain, known as the “feel good” hormone. But a recent research assessment found that depression is not at all related to serotonin levels.

If treatments that target our biology, including serotonin levels in the brain, aren’t the cure we were hoping for, where can we turn?

Seventy years after my grandfather first used drugs to treat depression, I think it’s time to broaden our approaches.

For example, some depression experts have suggested non-drug interventions. There is of course talk therapybut it can be costly and also takes time to translate into benefits.

Johann Hari, in his book Lost connections, refers to extensive research showing that depression can result from the loss of meaning and purpose in life – including a lack of satisfying interpersonal relationships and contact with nature. Loss of contact with nature, in particular, seems implausible as a cause of depression, but just remember that humans have essentially lived outdoors for most of our history, and that’s only been for about 100 years. years since we began to spend most of our time. nowadays inside homes and buildings. It robs us of the demonstrated positive impacts that the sights and smells of nature have on our body and mental health.

” LEARN MORE: Exercise Can Relieve Depression – Even at Lower Doses Than You Think

As a result of such thinking, health care providers outside the United States have pondered what this might mean for the treatment of depression. In the UK, clinicians offer social prescription, including recommending activities that provide meaning and enhance participation in society, such as volunteering, practicing the arts, participating in sports, learning about healthy cooking, and spending time with others. In Japan, they suggest shinrin-yoku, also known as “forest bathing.” Doctors in Canada prescribe nature walks and give their patients free one-year passes to Canada’s national park system.

To be clear: I’m not suggesting anyone ditch their prescription for a walk in nature. But I suggest we look beyond drugs when treating mental health. I am proud of my grandfather’s legacy, but I also believe that in many cases depression cannot be treated with antidepressants alone. It’s time to focus on a wider range of approaches to effectively treat depression and other mental health issues.

Mark Salzer is a psychologist and professor of social and behavioral sciences and director of the Collaborative on Community Inclusion of Individuals Psychiatric Disabilities at Temple University.

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Inmate released on appeal, after trial judge wrongly applied mental illness defense https://dystonia-dreams.org/inmate-released-on-appeal-after-trial-judge-wrongly-applied-mental-illness-defense/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 08:11:48 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/inmate-released-on-appeal-after-trial-judge-wrongly-applied-mental-illness-defense/ On September 22, 2017, Nick Masters veered onto the wrong side of Hastings River Drive in Port Macquarie and collided head-on with a car driven by Mr Ashenden, who was killed, while his wife, Mrs Ashenden, was seriously injured. injured. NSW District Court Judge Mark Marien found Masters guilty of two dangerous driving offenses and […]]]>

On September 22, 2017, Nick Masters veered onto the wrong side of Hastings River Drive in Port Macquarie and collided head-on with a car driven by Mr Ashenden, who was killed, while his wife, Mrs Ashenden, was seriously injured. injured.

NSW District Court Judge Mark Marien found Masters guilty of two dangerous driving offenses and sentenced the defendant to a three-year sentence. Intensive Correction Order (ICO).

The first charge was dangerous driving causing death, contrary to section 52A(1)(C) of the Crimes Act 1900 (New South Wales), which carries 10 years inside. The second was one count of dangerous driving causing grievous bodily harm, which falls under section 52A(3)(c) of the act, with a maximum of 7 years.

The main issue at trial was whether Masters, who was known to suffer from schizophrenia, should receive the special verdict of “not guilty by reason of mental illness”according section 38 the Mental Health (medico-legal provisions) (New South Wales) Act 1990, since repealed; a provision replaced by Section 28 of the Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment (NSW) Medico-legal Provisions Act 2020.

At the time of the accident, Masters was driving his car wearing only a shirt and underwear, and he had lacerations on his left wrist, as well as a puncture wound on the left side of his chest, which were not incompatible with the injuries he had sustained. ‘d probably acquired in the accident.

However, despite the testimony of two expert witnesses claiming that the defendant was not in a good state of mind at the time of the incident, his honor found that this defense had not been established and, therefore, Masters was found guilty on both counts. .

Seductive sanity

Masters appealed his convictions to the NSW Court of Criminal Appeal (NSWCCA) March 11 this yearbased on three grounds.

These included the fact that the judge’s interventions during the proceedings were excessive, resulting in procedural unfairness and miscarriage of justice, that he had applied the wrong test to gain the status of spirit of Masters and that the court should determine mental illness at the time of the offense.

The provision of section 38 now repealed provided that if it was established that a person suffered from mental illness at the time he committed a crime, then, since he was not responsible for the commission of the offense , a special verdict of not guilty on account of mental illness should be returned.

In her decision, NSWCCA Judge Julie Lonergan explained that such a finding is based on a balance of probabilities which recognizes that the offender was aware of the nature of his actions and may have been aware of their actions. illegality, but he did not appreciate his actions. were morally wrong.

Two prominent forensic psychiatrists, Dr. Adam Martin and Dr. Jonathon Adams, appeared at trial and determined that the defense was open to Masters, as he suffers from schizophrenia which manifests “in persistent delusions of persecution, thinking, disorganized behavior and distress”.

Regarding the first ground, Judge Lonergan said that if Judge Marien’s interventions were excessive, this did not encourage the experts to maintain their “well-founded opinions” regarding the defendant’s mental illness at the time of the trial. ‘accident.

A misinterpretation of authority

The 1843 established M’Naughten Rules were raised at trial, which provide that in establishing a defense of insanity, it must be proven that the accused had such an ill mind that he did not understand the nature of his actions or, if he did it, he didn’t know he was wrong.

Judge Marien was unconvinced by the psychological assessments Dr. Adams and Dr. Martin provided in the submitted reports, so His Honor called the two medical examiners into the courtroom to provide first-hand testimony to support for their assessments.

Adams, acting on behalf of the defense, provided evidence of Masters’ delusional behavior around the time before the crash, which suggested he was mentally ill. And Crown expert Martin said he agreed with Adams, but would argue more strongly.

With respect to the second ground of appeal, Judge Marien had misapplied the second part of the M’Naughten test, as he interpreted that the lack of understanding an offender had in undertaking morally wrong actions meant that it must be proven on the balance sheet.

However, His Honor then raised the point that the two expert witnesses had suggested that Masters maintained a modicum of capacity to understand the wrongfulness of his actions, and if that was the case, then the defense was not made out.

“It was a mistake,” Judge Lonergan said. His Honor goes on to explain that the M’Naughten test does not require the defendant to be disabled or incompetent, but rather that he is so disturbed that he cannot make a calm decision about the moral quality of his actions.

“It involves a lack of ability to reason with moderate composure, not a complete inability to recognize that the conduct is wrong,” His Honor explained in assessing the trial judge’s misinterpretation of the M’Naughten rules. instance, and added that this reason “must be respected”.

Evolution of Mental Health Laws

The third ground alleged that the court must now determine that Masters was mentally ill pursuant to subsection 7(4) of the Criminal Appeal Act 1912 (NSW), which states that if “a special verdict of proven but not criminally responsible act” is found, the original decision must be set aside.

“Section 7(4) does not require error to be established on appeal, but rather directs this court to review the evidence in order to determine afresh whether the appellant has discharged the burden of establish that he was mentally ill at the time of the offence,” the judge explained.

His Honor mentioned that despite Section 38 contained in an Act, which has since been superseded by the Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment (NSW) Medico-legal Provisions Act 2020 in March 2021, Acts which applied to the commission of the offense continue to apply to the Case.

Part 3 of the Forensic Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment Provisions Act 2020 contains sections setting out how the special verdict framework applies to criminal cases today.

Judge Lonergan added that if, in making its final decision in this case, the NSWCCA finds the special verdict of “not guilty by reason of mental illness”, it should be framed according to current terminology, which states “act proven but not criminally responsible”. .

Not criminally responsible

“It was the schizophrenia and its constellation of symptoms that he suffered from that affected the appellant at the time he drove in Mr. Ashenden’s car,” Judge Lonergan concluded. “These symptoms were delusions of persecution, thought disturbances, disorganized behavior and distress.”

“As a result, he was mentally ill, so as not to be legally responsible for his act at the time of the offenses and therefore at trial…there should have been a special verdict of not guilty on account of mental illness, she determined.

Upon finding this, Judge Lonergan ordered on October 24 that Masters’ convictions be overturned, that the special verdict be defined as “acts proven but not criminally responsible” and that Masters be released as long as he complies with a community treatment order and takes his medication.

Acting NSWCCA Judge Paul Brereton and Judge Natalia Adams accepted their colleague’s orders.

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Stigma Surrounds Mental Illness | Opinion https://dystonia-dreams.org/stigma-surrounds-mental-illness-opinion/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/stigma-surrounds-mental-illness-opinion/ Anyone who has firsthand insight into the health problems brought about by mental illness quickly realizes how these afflictions and the people who experience them are often misunderstood, maligned, dismissed or mistrusted. Whether your perspective is that of a professional like me, a family member of someone in pain, or someone experiencing the painful breakdown […]]]>

Anyone who has firsthand insight into the health problems brought about by mental illness quickly realizes how these afflictions and the people who experience them are often misunderstood, maligned, dismissed or mistrusted. Whether your perspective is that of a professional like me, a family member of someone in pain, or someone experiencing the painful breakdown of their thoughts, feelings, and actions, you quickly realize that mental illness always carries with it an undeserved mark of disdain. The term for this is stigma.

Over the past decade or more, we have begun to think that there are finally signs that this nefarious social phenomenon is waning. You can find prime-time television commercials for psychiatric drugs or print ads in major magazines; you could hear personalities from the world of entertainment or sports talking openly about their mental health. During the pandemic, almost everyone has experienced the stress, anxiety and disruption caused by this global crisis and felt a new appreciation that mental health was indeed a vital part of health, just as real as any other. kind of disease. But, just like the COVID-19 virus, the stigma will not go away.

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Mental Illness Insurance: Mental Illness Claims Rise by 50% – How Will IRDAI’s Directive Beneficial? https://dystonia-dreams.org/mental-illness-insurance-mental-illness-claims-rise-by-50-how-will-irdais-directive-beneficial/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 14:51:21 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/mental-illness-insurance-mental-illness-claims-rise-by-50-how-will-irdais-directive-beneficial/ Mental health insurance: After the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, it has been noticed that many people are going to hospitals for stress-related issues. There can be various reasons behind this – spending a lot of time in isolation, losing loved ones and financial losses. According to online insurance aggregator Policy Bazaar, there has been […]]]>

Mental health insurance: After the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, it has been noticed that many people are going to hospitals for stress-related issues. There can be various reasons behind this – spending a lot of time in isolation, losing loved ones and financial losses. According to online insurance aggregator Policy Bazaar, there has been an increase of around 50% in claims related to mental illness in the last year. It comes at a time when all health insurance companies have been categorically questioned by the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDAI) provide coverage for mental illness under health insurance policies. The deadline to implement the same ended on October 31, 2022.

How many companies have followed the IRDAI guidelines?

Siddharth Singhal – Business Head, Health Insurance, Policybazaar.com – told Zee Business that each company has complied with the insurance regulator’s decision.

“Whether it is a stand-alone health insurance company or a general health insurance provider, everyone must comply with the guidelines of IRDAI. Thus, each of them now covers the disease mental illness as part of his health insurance policies,” Singhal said.

What does the IRDAI directive say?

According to Singhal, the IRDAI directive in layman’s language means that all health insurance companies must treat mental illness as physical illness.

“In a physical illness, there is a clear line of treatment. In contrast, there is no clear line of treatment in the case of a mental illness. The IRDAI simply states that if a person with an illness mental illness is hospitalized, the insurer will have to pay for it,” Singhal said.

Venkatesh Naidu – CEO of Bajaj Capital Insurance Broking Ltd – said IRDAI’s decision will make mental health care accessible to everyone.

What does it mean?

Naidu said the IRDAI exposure draft states that insurers cannot deny coverage to policyholders who have ever used opioids or antidepressants.

“Insurers also cannot deny coverage to people who have a documented history of clinical depression, personality or neurodegenerative disorders, sociopathy or psychopathy. In addition, IRDAI has directed insurers to include disorders related to puberty and menopause, as well as age-related macular disorders, in standard health insurance plans In line with IRDAI guidelines, many insurers have begun to develop products that address the specific needs of people with mental illness,” he told Zee Business.

“In mental illness, many people need OPD treatment. For example, a person with depression may have to see a doctor or psychiatrist several times and not require hospitalization. So it becomes very important that a client has OPD coverage so that these consultations can be covered,” Singhal said.

Things to keep in mind with pre-existing mental illness

Most of the time, hospitalizations for mental disorders are covered by regular health plans, however, outpatient counseling or therapy is only covered if the plan offers OPD benefits. In the event of a pre-existing mental disorder, the insurer is free to treat it as such and to decide the waiting period, generally 2 to 3 years.

“If you are looking for mental illness coverage, check to see if the disorder requires hospitalization or can be treated with therapy and medication. In the first case, opt for a comprehensive indemnity plan that covers hospitalization, while the second will require a plan that also offers OPD,” Naidu added.

How will things change now?

According to Singhal, health insurance companies used to immediately deny health insurance to people with mental illness.

“A lot of health insurance companies wouldn’t even accept the proposal if someone was suffering from mental illness. But now they are mandated to provide health insurance. However, the insurer can put it under a period of expectation depending on the type of policy one purchases.”

Abhishek Mahato – Senior Officer, Pazcare – believes that IRDAI’s decision is a welcome move to bring uniformity.

“Mental wellness is the need of the hour in these dynamic times. This IRDAI regulation is a welcome move to achieve uniformity. As before, only selective companies included mental illness in their benefits, not all have it as the norm. With this initiative, everyone will have mental illness covered and treatment accessible. It is good to see the authorities breaking taboos by treating mental health as equal to physical health Mahato said.

The move has also been welcomed by companies, as they believe adding mental illness to insurance coverage will help companies further expand their benefits while improving their employee experience.

“Mental health is certainly very important to every employee and their family members. Mental health insurance coverage should be welcomed in every organization. We are extremely pleased that mental wellbeing is receiving attention wanted in the workplace as it will be a win-win for the employer as well as the employee,” said Sumit Sabharwal – CEO of TeamLease HRtech.

What is mental illness?

Mental illness, also called a mental health disorder, is characterized by a clinically significant disturbance in an individual’s cognition, emotional regulation, or behavior.

According to Dr. Mimansa Singh Tanwar – Clinical Psychologist and Mental Health Program Manager at Fortis School, Fortis Healthcare Ltd. – mental illness is a collection of symptoms in which we examine how these symptoms affect our daily functioning.

“There are a wide range of conditions that we look for in mental illness that actually cause functional impairment. Functional impairment means that in your daily activities you will find that your mood is so low that you are unable to function. engage in social interactions. , you avoid work and are not able to put effort into your work. In addition, these people would have difficulty sleeping and they would not be comfortable waking up at a certain hour you might be very anxious and similar things,” Dr Tanwar said.

What causes mental illness?

According to Dr. Tanwar, mental illness is caused by three basic factors – biological, psychological and environmental.

“Biological factor, i.e. genetics and the neurotransmitters that play a role in it. Psychosocial functioning, i.e. your environment. Any long-term stress that has been present or any immediate stress resulting from a traumatic experience of the environment, for example your school, family in the office, etc. Psychological factor, i.e. our basic temperament or attitude to deal with daily problems.These factors can cause illness mental,” she added.

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Health insurance policies to cover mental illness from November 1 https://dystonia-dreams.org/health-insurance-policies-to-cover-mental-illness-from-november-1/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 07:44:05 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/health-insurance-policies-to-cover-mental-illness-from-november-1/ The coverage of health insurance policies is expanding: The Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) has made it mandatory for all health insurance policies to cover mental illness. Previously, most health insurance policies did not cover mental illness, whether pre-existing or diagnosed after the policy was purchased. However, this will change from 1 […]]]>

The coverage of health insurance policies is expanding: The Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) has made it mandatory for all health insurance policies to cover mental illness. Previously, most health insurance policies did not cover mental illness, whether pre-existing or diagnosed after the policy was purchased. However, this will change from 1 November.Read also – Uttar Pradesh: Woman chained for 36 years finally gets her freedom

This will cover both new and old insurance plans

“This compulsory coverage means that insurers will have to consider mental illnesses in the same way as physical illnesses, in both old and new policies. This means that the insured will also be covered for hospitalization costs related to mental illness treatments,” ET quotes Siddharth Singhal, Business Head-Health Insurance, Policybazaar.com Read also – Money talks: As claims double and health insurance premiums rise, use these tips to save your money

New rule will make coverage for all sorts of mental illnesses mandatory

Diseases like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease were not covered by basic comprehensive health policies before. Not anymore. “All mental illnesses such as dementia, depression and bipolar disorder must be covered unless certain specific exclusions are mentioned in the policy,” says Singhal. Read also – New surrogacy rules: Couples must purchase 3-year health insurance for surrogate mothers. All the details here

Will the OPD cost of mental illness be covered?

Most health insurance coverage only works when 24 hours of hospitalization is required. These policies will cover any mental illness requiring such hospitalization.

However, there are many new insurance policies that offer OPD coverage. What happens here if diagnosed with mental illness? “If the client has purchased OPD coverage, the costs for medical consultation, diagnostic tests, etc. will also be covered by the insurer,” Singhal explains.

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What I want my neighbors to know about my mental illness https://dystonia-dreams.org/what-i-want-my-neighbors-to-know-about-my-mental-illness/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 13:09:08 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/what-i-want-my-neighbors-to-know-about-my-mental-illness/ I live in an apartment complex in a busy part of my city. From my second-story balcony, I can see my neighbors coming and going from work, appointments, errands, and other activities. Although I get a glimpse of their daily lives, I don’t really know any of my neighbors on a personal level. The extent […]]]>

I live in an apartment complex in a busy part of my city. From my second-story balcony, I can see my neighbors coming and going from work, appointments, errands, and other activities. Although I get a glimpse of their daily lives, I don’t really know any of my neighbors on a personal level. The extent of my interactions with my neighbors consists of a polite “Hello, how are you?” or “Good day”, type exchanges. Sometimes I wonder what my neighbors notice about me.

I live a fairly isolated life, except for the occasional visit from my family. I look physically fit, neat and reasonably healthy. Although I am much less sociable, my state of mental health is not detectable outwardly. I often wonder how my neighbors would react if they knew I had schizophrenia.

Most people know that mental illness has an impact on a person’s thinking or behavior. However, due to the pervasive stigma surrounding mental illness, people may be unaware that mental health issues can be treated (usually with a combination of medication and therapy) – and people with mental illness can lead a normal and happy life.

I have often thought about what I would like to be able to communicate to my neighbours. My illness greatly affects my life — like any physical illness — but schizophrenia does not define me. If I could tell my neighbors about myself, here is what I would share:

I am not a danger

If my neighbors learned that I have schizophrenia, I would like them to know that I am not a danger to them. I would like to explain that negative portrayals of this condition in the media are misleading and sensationalistic; I don’t own a gun, I’m not wildly unpredictable, and I’m certainly not a serial killer, despite what crime dramas may suggest. In reality, Studies show that I am more likely to be the victim of a crime than to be the perpetrator.

Ultimately, I understand that the label of my diagnosis can be intimidating to people unfamiliar with serious mental illnesses, but I hope to start a dialogue and explain my situation. I would be happy to share my daily experience, from my symptoms to the medications I take.

I lead a productive and meaningful life

If my neighbors learned of my diagnosis, I would want them to see my complexity as a person. First, that I’m not a dangerous criminal, but more than that, I have a productive life as a writer and mental health advocate. I have learned and proven that words can be powerful if used in the right way. I use my voice as a spokesperson to educate people about the lived experience of serious mental illness. And I’m open to having difficult conversations; there’s no question about my mental illness that i’m afraid to answer, and if i don’t know, i do my best to find the answer.

My work goes beyond mental health advocacy. I would also like my neighbors to know that I am an American patriot; I am a veteran who served my country in the US military. I love that America is a country of diversity – and a big part of what makes us a great country is that we value the unique contributions of all of our citizens. And I have many contributions to offer.

I have similar hobbies, interests and needs

Although my life may seem different from that of my neighbors, we have a lot in common. From my balcony, I see some of my neighbors playing sports. I would like them to know that I have always enjoyed physical exercise. Specifically, I love playing basketball and would appreciate someone asking to play basketball on the new court near our apartments. I also like to work out and would like to have a training partner when I use the fitness center at our apartment complex. Not only is exercise fun, but it also helps me manage my symptoms.

Ultimately, I want my neighbors to know that I have the same emotional needs as everyone else. While they may not see many people coming in and out of my apartment, I want them to know that sometimes I like having company – just someone to hang out with or watch a football game. I have a large collection of vinyl records and would like to show them my jazz collection. I also love to cook and would love to cook for others, not just me. Maybe a neighbor and I could cook together. The combination of a home-cooked dinner and good jazz sounded like a wonderful evening to me.

I believe social connections are the solution

Those of us with a mental health diagnosis simply want to be seen for who we are and to feel understood when we encounter mental health issues. We are productive, well-meaning people who make a major contribution to our society every day. With one in four people affected by mental illness, it’s safe to say that people at all levels of society struggle every day to overcome the stigma that isolates us. I believe the solution lies in simply talking to those around us – to find the things we have in common.

I would jump at the chance to explore some of these commonalities with some of my neighbors.

Jason Jepson grew up in Virginia, but now lives in Myrtle Beach, SC, where he advocates for those diagnosed with serious mental illness. Jason was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder while drafted into the United States Army. He began his mental health advocacy with NAMI, where he received peer-to-peer certification, and has since continued to volunteer to help veterans who struggle with mental health issues. Jason has written two books, and his first-person account of everyday life with schizophrenia has been published in Schizophrenia Bulletin, an academic journal published by Oxford Press.

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