Mental health – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:54:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://dystonia-dreams.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70x70.jpg Mental health – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ 32 32 Survey Finds 70% of Workers Worried About Disclosing Their Mental Health Problem to Their Employer https://dystonia-dreams.org/survey-finds-70-of-workers-worried-about-disclosing-their-mental-health-problem-to-their-employer/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:44:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/survey-finds-70-of-workers-worried-about-disclosing-their-mental-health-problem-to-their-employer/ Seventy percent of Irish workers fear that disclosure of a mental health issue will impact their work and cause them to be treated differently by their colleagues and managers, according to a new study. Almost half of those polled in a survey by mental health group See Change said they believed disclosure of such an […]]]>

Seventy percent of Irish workers fear that disclosure of a mental health issue will impact their work and cause them to be treated differently by their colleagues and managers, according to a new study.

Almost half of those polled in a survey by mental health group See Change said they believed disclosure of such an issue would lead them to be ignored for a promotion, and 37% said that ‘they feared they would be excluded from tasks and meetings.

Research found that workers’ fears of revealing mental illness were linked to mental health stigma, which See Change seeks to combat.

The study, conducted online with 650 people, found that a fifth of workers believed mental health-related stigma to be prevalent in their workplace, with 40 percent of respondents saying they had witnessed some form of mental health stigma. stigmatizing behavior in their workplace.

See Ambassador for Change Adrian Yeates said it boiled down to “a lack of knowledge or understanding of mental illness.”

“We fear what we don’t know and therefore avoid dealing with subjects that might be taboo or ‘too complicated’. Unfortunately, some workplace leaders still adhere to the myth that only ‘strong’ people succeed, so they dare not acknowledge any perceived weakness or vulnerability, ”he said.

Many employees said workplaces were visibly unable to cope with complex mental illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or psychosis.

The research revealed a lack of employee knowledge of workplace mental health legislation, with 60 percent of workers unaware that mental health is covered by legislation and the nine grounds of discrimination related to disability.

“While many organizations have made progress in ending the stigma associated with mental health, it is clear that there is still a lot of work to be done to alleviate the fear that having mental health issues is harming people’s lives. a person’s career, ”said Barbara Brennan, See Manager of Change Programs.


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Why this 18-year-old demands better mental health care for “the lost year” https://dystonia-dreams.org/why-this-18-year-old-demands-better-mental-health-care-for-the-lost-year/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/why-this-18-year-old-demands-better-mental-health-care-for-the-lost-year/ Lola Trembath says she will never forget the first time she entered the Adult Psychiatry Unit at the Dr Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital in Fredericton. It was last March, just eight days after his 18th birthday. She was scared and alone, desperately seeking help after serious thoughts of harming herself. “It was a shock because […]]]>

Lola Trembath says she will never forget the first time she entered the Adult Psychiatry Unit at the Dr Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital in Fredericton.

It was last March, just eight days after his 18th birthday. She was scared and alone, desperately seeking help after serious thoughts of harming herself.

“It was a shock because there are people there who are almost 80 years old, and I was 18,” Trembath said.

However, she knew about these unhealthy thoughts and knew that she needed hospital care.

For four years, Trembath struggled with mental health issues. A suicide attempt left her on life support for seven days when she was 16, and she was hospitalized 13 times.

She had been through it all, at least she believed, until she encountered what she saw as the harsh environment of 2 Southeast, at the Chalmers.

“[There were] a few times when there were other patients that i understand weren’t all okay, but some were verbally abusive with me so it wasn’t helpful, ”said Trembath.

“I find that the environment plays a big role in making things worse and not necessarily in making them better.”

Due to provincial policy, Chalmers Hospital admits 18-year-olds in need of psychiatric care to an adult unit, but Trembath says they should be treated in a pediatric unit. (Google Maps)

Trembath said she did not feel safe or supported in the unit. She said she often had to share a bedroom and was uncomfortable with the showers being in unlocked rooms which she described as being mostly out of sight of the nurses station.

She recounted an incident which she found particularly frightening, when a woman entered her room and refused to come out.

Trembath’s parents want the provincial government to change the pediatric age range to include 18-year-olds – a concept supported by the New Brunswick Children and Young Assistants limit for the advocate.

“I understand there has to be an age when things have to go off and on, but 18, especially when you’re dealing with mental illness, I don’t think that’s fair,” said his mother, Natalie Way.

Way calls it “the lost year”.

“It’s her brain that’s sick, and I don’t think it’s an adequate age for her to be able to and have to make decisions on her own and stand up for herself.”

During Trembath’s previous admissions to the pediatric unit, his psychiatrist, psychologist and parents were able to visit him and provide him with comprehensive care. Her parents say that doesn’t happen on the adult floor, where she’s been admitted three times this year, most recently last week.

The situation is made worse by the fact that Trembath was unable to have visitors due to COVID restrictions.

Lexi Daken of Fredericton, pictured here on a player card, committed suicide in February after repeatedly asking for help. (Submitted by Chris Daken)

Even when the hospital authorized what Horizon Health Network calls Designated Support Persons or DSPs, Lola became ineligible as a patient at the age of 18. Pediatric patients are included in the specified group of patients eligible for PSD, but adult psychiatric patients are not.

Trembath’s father, Jason George, believes health officials should exercise discretion when it comes to young people and the vulnerable.

“In these extraordinary times, they should know from our history and the record that we would be supportive for her,” said George.

In a statement, Horizon Health said its Designated Support Person program is intended to provide eligible patients with an active partner in care.

“Limiting foot traffic in our hospitals is essential to protect our most vulnerable patients, as well as our doctors and staff, from the risks of COVID-19,” spokesman Kris McDavid said in a statement.

CBC News requested further comment from Horizon Health, as well as the Department of Health, and did not receive a response.

Flexible system

Christian Whalen, the deputy advocate for children and youth, strongly agrees that young people should not be cut off from necessary services before they are ready.

“I wonder why this transition happens at 18? And not at 19, for example? In New Brunswick, 19 is the age of majority, ”said Whalen.

He sympathized with Trembath’s situation and said he had heard from many families with similar concerns over the years.

“At 18, she should still be able to benefit from some of the specialized services available to children and youth,” Whalen said.

“And whatever a particular mental health problem is, maybe we need some flexibility, so that we can avoid these really difficult transitions for young people in times of crisis, and that we can have a suitable system and flexible that meets them where they are and what they need. “

He said some European countries are dedicating facilities to care for 15-25 year olds struggling with mental health issues, as this is the key age group, when the brain is still developing.

“If we can develop suitable and dedicated services for this age group, then we can give them the best care,” said Whalen. “Then we’re going to equip them, you know, with a path to recovery and help them manage their disease.”

Lexi Daken’s Legacy

In September, Whalen’s office released a report and a series of recommendations to the province, following a thorough examination of the high-profile death of Lexi Daken. The 16-year-old took her own life after months of seeking help and trying to access services in Fredericton.

The Daken family took Lexi’s story public to bring about changes in the mental health system. Chris Daken, Lexi’s father, said some parents have since contacted him to let him know that improvements have been made thanks to Lexi’s legacy.

But he hears just as many families who feel discouraged.

“Some things are probably still the same which is not good,” Daken said. “But you know, we always have to hope that, you know, things will get better.”

Chris Daken with his daughter Lexi when she was about two years old. (Submitted by Chris Daken)

He said a mother of a 16-year-old girl contacted him recently to describe what started as a pleasant experience in the emergency department and deteriorated into a bureaucratic mess. He said the teenager’s referral was sent to the wrong place.

“That’s basically what happened to Lexi, and she had to go through many channels to get her daughter into mental health care,” Daken said.

According to Whalen, complaints about access to hospital care and the quality of health care regularly make up around 15 to 20 percent of cases for the Child and Youth Advocate. He said complaints have increased during the pandemic, particularly since the review was announced last spring.

Lola Trembath feels personally connected to Lexi Daken because they have faced similar experiences.

“She feels like the lucky one, while Lexi wasn’t,” said George.

“I just think it was a call to action that got a lot of talk, and there haven’t been any boots on the pitch or substantial changes that we’ve seen so far. I mean, we are still fighting the system even in a crisis that we are now in. We are still fighting the system to get the support we feel is necessary, despite everything Lexi and her family have been through.

Whalen said the office of the Child and Youth Advocate was in the phase of following up on the recommendations.

“We don’t want to just publish this report and, you know, say good luck to the Department of Health. We’re going to follow up and monitor what’s been done,” Whalen said.

If you need help:

CHIMO Hotline: 1-800-667-5005 / http://www.chimohelpline.ca

Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868

Canadian Suicide Prevention Service: 1-833-456-4566.


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John Humphrys – Mental health: a devious idea? https://dystonia-dreams.org/john-humphrys-mental-health-a-devious-idea/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 09:20:06 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/john-humphrys-mental-health-a-devious-idea/ Changes in the way we use language are often a sure sign of changes in the way we think about the world. Consider the efforts of militant groups to try to control the words we use to talk about homosexuality, for example, or racial groups, or what pronouns we should use when it comes to […]]]>

Changes in the way we use language are often a sure sign of changes in the way we think about the world. Consider the efforts of militant groups to try to control the words we use to talk about homosexuality, for example, or racial groups, or what pronouns we should use when it comes to different genders. The goal is to change the way we think by changing the way we speak. The term “mental health” is the latest example. Go back only a few decades and you would be hard pressed to find anyone who uses it outside of the circle of professionals dealing with mental illness. Now it’s ubiquitous. Even school children talk about their mental health when asked how they are doing. But are we now using the term too loosely? And are there any dangers in this?

For many people, the change did not come soon enough. Our previous failure to utter the phrase, they argue, was simply a reflection of our turning a blind eye to an obvious source of human suffering and unhappiness. It wasn’t that long ago that we just divided people into two categories. There were the madmen, the madmen, the madmen (better locked in an institution) on one side, and the rest of us on the other. It is true that in the last century or so we started to apply a little more discrimination in the treatment of people who were obviously mentally ill. Now we are making distinctions between different categories of mental illnesses that have little in common, such as depression, schizophrenia, autism, and what we now call bipolar disorder. We used to call it manic depression. Nevertheless, according to the argument, we have been slow to get rid of the idea that on the one hand there are the mentally ill – no matter how many categories we have divided them into – and on the other hand there are there were the rest of us.

For a long time, the idea that we could all be subject to varying degrees of mental illness, just as we are all vulnerable to varying degrees of physical illness, barely existed. Indeed, the mental and the physical were considered as two completely distinct, if not completely independent, aspects of our being. It is the breaking of that dichotomy, the realization that our bodies and minds interact with each other, that has led us to talk about mental health just as we talk about physical health. We now know that there is a psychosomatic illness – an illness that manifests itself in a physical form but the cause of which may very well be mental. We also realize that just as the body can only take a limited amount of physical stress before something gives in – the heart, our lungs, our limbs – our mind can only take a limited amount of mental stress. Put too much mental stress on ourselves and we suffer from what even previous generations recognized as “mental depression”.

You might argue that moving to the term “mental health” is a welcome step. There are now ways to “treat” those who do not fit into the major recognized categories of mental illness, but who feel that what is going on in their mind is preventing them from functioning as well as they think they are. There are talk therapy, developed since Freud and Jung began to study this whole area of ​​human experience. And there are simpler “hands-on” approaches, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT. Ten sessions with a specialist practitioner can help them think differently about life, their relationships with others, etc. It might help them change their routines: exercise; better nutrition; go to bed earlier. And of course there may be some pills that could help as well.

From this perspective, our new disposition to talk about mental health is totally liberating and opens up the possibility of reducing human suffering and unhappiness. Why, then, would anyone want to ask if this is a good thing?

The first reason can be summarized succinctly: it is that it risks medicalizing the human experience. Living is, after all, an essentially subjective matter. It is something that we live and this experience is unique to each of us. The experience is a bit like being on a roller coaster that everyone individually has to adapt to as best they can. We experience joy and sorrow, heavy moods and light moods, we feel high and low and we negotiate our way through it all.

The risk of interpreting all this subjective experience in terms of “sanity” is that we begin to objectify what is primarily, and essentially, subjective: it makes us wonder if the fact that we feel sad, in a bad mood , it’s because we have a “mental health problem”. Life passes from the rich and not always easy subjective experience of what we “are” to the objective and independent questioning of what we can have “”. This risks turning us into passive spectators of our own lives: we have something, so we must turn to others for professional help.

There is another risk with this. It can become too easy to identify “good” mood with being in good health and “bad” mood with mental health “problems”. Yet a life in which only “good” moods are lived is certainly a much less rich life than a life in which all subjective experience is accepted as what it means to live life to the fullest.

This approach to our subjective experience can be particularly pernicious when applied to children. The whole business of growing up involves the intense subjective experience of realizing that life is a roller coaster of emotions and learning to hang on. It is through this experience and learning to hold on that children build character and learn what personal responsibility is. Encouraging children to see all of this through the lens of mental health issues is giving them a free pass. The fact that they feel this stuff has nothing to do with them and it’s not up to them to learn to navigate it because they have a mental health “problem”. It’s up to adults to sort that out. For children, talking about mental health is inextricably linked to the simple question “am I having something wrong with my mind?” Indeed, more widely in use, the expression “mental health” seems to quickly transform into a synonym for “mental illness”.

To speak of the risk of medicalizing the ordinary human experience through the use of the expression “mental health” is not to deny that there are both adults and children who are indeed mentally ill and who could benefit. professional help. The point is, using the phrase as loosely and pervasively as we seem to do risks encouraging people who don’t have mental health “problems” to think they do.

But there is another worry. It is that we can make false assumptions about what threatens mental health and also about how to treat it. Our flippant talk about “stress” is a case in point. “Stress” has become an abominable word in our public conversation. It is assumed that more stress is bad for people and less stress is good. But it is surely not that simple. The Greeks were right: “nothing in excess” is the way to live a healthy life. But the subtlety of the point is that in this sentence the word “nothing” works both ways: we should aim to avoid excesses not only by “too much” but also by “too little”. Too little stress can lead to mentally unhealthy lives (see those who inherit too much money and don’t know what to do with their life) just as too much stress can. In this, it equates exactly to physical stress – too little leaves the body weaker than it would be if it were under more physical stress.

And are we sure we know what contributes to “mental health”? The Atom Bank, one of Britain’s largest digital banks, has announced it will cut its workweek from five to four days without losing pay. It was doing so, he said, “to help improve the mental and physical well-being of employees.” Well, so much the better for them to avoid the expression “sanity”. But why assume that working less is good for mental well-being? Some people get their mental well-being from work. I am one of them). And, more broadly, there is the most enormous

the hypothesis formulated in this now standard expression “work-life balance”. It is that work and life are in some way opposed to each other and need to be balanced, rather than work is part of life and “balance” is not. the whole problem. That’s not to say that many people would benefit from working less, spending more time with their kids, and taking long walks in the fall sun. But generally, the unexamined hypothesis is that less work equals better mental health. Truly? Always?

Finally, there is a much more sinister factor to consider in considering whether we should be so free in our discourse on “sanity”. It is because there are powerful interests at stake. I am referring, of course, to the powerful pharmaceutical companies in all of this. Creating a market for drugs to treat “mental health problems” is addictive, addictive, and potentially huge profits. Many people familiar with the opioid epidemic in the United States assume that it was caused by addiction that can arise from the recreational use of illegal drugs. Much of it may well have been. But much of it was caused by a lifelong addiction to perfectly legal drugs prescribed to treat mental health issues. The increasing prescribing of these drugs to children should alarm us all.

There has been a staggering increase in the number of people being prescribed antidepressants in England today. Over seven million. More terrifyingly, about a quarter of a million of them are children between the ages of five and sixteen.

Is it really possible that life is so much harder for a child today than it was a generation ago? So difficult that the only answer is to embark on the nightmarish journey that can lead to drug addiction?

So what should we do with our increasingly loose use of the term “sanity”? Is this a late release for people who have so far suffered without being heard or helped? Or does it risk turning our ordinary life experiences into a form of illness, leaving us to passively look at our own lives from the side while others “treat” us? Or is it a bit of both – in which case how should we strive for the benefits without the costs?

Tell us what you think

Disclaimer

YouGov plc published this content on November 29, 2021 and is solely responsible for the information it contains. Distributed by Public, unedited and unmodified, on November 29, 2021 09:19:04 AM UTC.


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Vivid tributes to leader in mental health nursing after sudden death https://dystonia-dreams.org/vivid-tributes-to-leader-in-mental-health-nursing-after-sudden-death/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 07:01:22 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/vivid-tributes-to-leader-in-mental-health-nursing-after-sudden-death/ An accomplished mental health nurse and nursing leader who worked to “improve service” has passed away suddenly at the age of 56. Elaine Thompson, who was most recently acting chief nurse for quality and contracts at the NHS East Leicestershire and the Rutland Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), died on October 22, just two days before […]]]>

An accomplished mental health nurse and nursing leader who worked to “improve service” has passed away suddenly at the age of 56.

Elaine Thompson, who was most recently acting chief nurse for quality and contracts at the NHS East Leicestershire and the Rutland Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), died on October 22, just two days before her 57th birthday.

Her husband of 32 years, Laurence Thompson, said Breastfeeding time Ms Thompson’s cause of death was unclear, but she was diagnosed with ischemic heart disease and suffered from seizures before she died.

Ms Thompson had retired from nursing just a year before her death, after nearly 40 years of work as a nurse.

“There are these people you work with and they leave and you think ‘I don’t remember who they are’, with Elaine it’s not like that”

Marianne Cole

Six weeks before her death, Ms Thompson had had a seizure at home and several seizures in hospital and was fitted with a pacemaker. She was released from the hospital and her family and friends thought she would be fine until the shocking news arrived.

Mr Thompson said the couple, who lived together in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, had planned to travel the world for their retirement, “she had wanted to visit Iceland, Canada, Alaska and Japan”.

He described her as “full of life, full of energy, really bubbly, really smart”.

The dynamic of their marriage had been that she was the loveseat and Mr. Thompson the listener.

“She had a brain that never stopped or was silent,” he said.

Ms Thompson met her husband in December 1988 and they were married in September 1989. They shared a love for mythical creatures, putting together a collection of dragons and wizarding figurines displayed in a specially designed cabinet in their home, as well as statues of dragons. decorate their garden.

Before getting married, on a day trip to Broadway in the Cotswolds, Mr Thompson spotted a dragon and a wizard figurine in a shop window and Ms Thompson said she would not have been disturbed to have them. Later, Mr. Thompson went back to the store and bought them for her as a wedding present and it grew from there.

Elaine Thompson and her dog Merlin

Ms Thompson’s career began in 1982 at Barnsley Hall Hospital where she trained as a student nurse. It was a mental institution in Worcestershire and his father was the hospital administrator.

“She kind of had it in her DNA,” said Ms. Thompson’s sister Alison Tedstone.

Ms Thompson was 17 when she started at Barnsley Hall. By 2013, she had worked her way up the chain to become Assistant Head Nurse and then Assistant Head Nurse at Birmingham CrossCity CCG.

She has also served as Head of Nursing, Care Transformation and Mental Health at NHS Birmingham and Solihull CCG, and Head of Quality and Safety at NHS England for the Birmingham region, Solihull and Black Country.

Ms Tedstone explained how their father did not want his daughter to enter nursing and especially mental health nursing.

“In these large mental hospitals there were quite often attacks on nurses,” she said. “He didn’t think she would be safe working there.”

Ms Tedstone even said at first that Ms Thompson was the “tomboy” and that she herself was the “primitive”, which annoyed her sister.

She added, “She’s more talented artistically than I am. Elaine is one of those irritating people who could dedicate herself to doing things.

“She learned to do crafts and sewing on her own. She was musical, she played guitar, she could sing, and she learned to play keyboards on her own.”

In addition to traveling the world, Ms. Thompson had wanted to compete on Mastermind.

Her sister said that “if she wanted to do something, she would go do it”.

The two sisters fought in childhood and early adulthood, but came together when it was time to care for their parents; their father first died in 2016 at the age of 91, then their mother suffering from dementia and currently in a retirement home. The sisters chose her retirement home together and both oversaw her care.

“My sister has always been there for me and I have always been there for her,” Ms. Tedstone said.

“She was musical, she played guitar, she could sing, and she learned to play keyboards herself”

Alison tedstone

Early in her retirement, at age 55, Ms. Thompson began working to keep her mind active. She worked on a project in Leicester for a former boss Manjeet Garcha and then on another short-term contract for the NHS Coventry & Warwickshire CCG. Ms Thompson had been with the project for several weeks when she died.

Mrs Garcha said Breastfeeding time Ms. Thompson would never bow to say “oh, I can’t do that”.

“She started to work more and the week she was spent she sat on a virtual absence day that we organized, and she was normal herself,” Ms. Garcha said.

“It was absolutely the most shocking news that two days after the day away we lost her. She’s not just a loss as a friend and colleague, it’s a huge loss for health. She wasn’t the type to say that’s it. I’m done. She was a wonderful caregiver, sister and friend. “

She added: “She was totally selfless and totally dedicated, one of those people who just got her, you didn’t have to explain too much to her, she added so much more, she went above and beyond what you asked him to do, going beyond the service line.

“As a mental health nurse she brought that extra thought, she would bring holistic thinking to anything that was great because it’s not always obvious to others.”

Many other former colleagues of Ms Thompson wanted to pay tribute to them and reflect on the work, support and help she had given them.

Marianne Cole, warden at Bushey Fields Hospital in Dudley, where Ms Thompson had worked, said: ‘There are these people you work with and they leave and you think’ I don’t remember who they are “, with Elaine it’s not like that.

“She was a big girl with a big character. She always had a story to tell. Her memory of things, she was like an encyclopedia, she was able to click on stuff right away. I refuse anyone to dislike Elaine. , to have met her and not committed. “

Ms Cole said, which was a role model, that Ms Thompson acted as a mentor and was largely the reason Ms Cole was where she is now in her career.

“Even when I had hard times at home, hard times in a personal way, she helped me and she guided me and she told me again; for her, that was what she enjoyed. To”

Jasvinder Chopra Povall

“I started using her as a clinical supervisor, the best I could do, all the worries I had, how I could develop further, and she would still be really on that. The world lost a precious person. “

Reflecting on her friend’s death, Sheila Sievewright, an occupational therapist, spoke at length about her friend and former colleague, highlighting the years they had worked together at Burton Road Hospital in Dudley, West Midlands , in the 1990s.

She described the time, patience and innovative ways in which Ms. Thompson cared for patients, never being patronizing and always taking the time to understand their needs.

“She was just showing enthusiasm in everything and thinking outside the box. She was like, ‘Well why don’t we try that way’ and I thought, ‘Oh no, that won’t work’, but generally made.”

Mrs Sievewright said Breastfeeding time about the group, Validation, which Ms Thompson created, for patients with dementia, to defuse difficult situations between patients and nurses and to help nurses understand how the patient was feeling.

The news of Ms Thompson’s death came as a shock to Ms Sievewright who had maintained contact since meeting in the 1990s.

“She and her husband were with me five days before her death, she brought me a birthday present and an exquisite homemade card which was very typical behavior for her, always thinking of others, despite a recent operation. cardiac, ”Ms. Sievewright said. .

She had disapproved of Mrs. Thompson’s work during her recovery. “We were all texting her saying, ‘Don’t you dare, you’re supposed to be resting’ and she said, ‘Oh no, it’s okay, I’m going to work at home, I’m not overdoing it’. .

Ms Sievewright was so saddened that Ms Thompson never reached her 57th birthday.

She explained the degree of responsibility assumed by Ms Thompson, which she would not recognize.

“Over the past six months, Elaine has had a lot of changes to adapt to and priorities to juggle; job changes, semi-retirement, support and organization of the move of two relatives in an institution, the loss of their dear dog Merlin; all of this must have had an impact on her, ”she said.

Jasvinder Chopra-Povall, acting divisional director of quality and nursing, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS trust, a role she has held for two years, said Ms Thompson had helped her get it.

“This is something that she helped and supported me in, in the interviews that took place she always said ‘you can do it’,” Ms. Chopra-Povall said.

“Even when I had hard times at home, hard times in a personal way, she helped me and she guided me and she told me again; for her, that was what she liked.”

On the week of her death, Ms Chopra-Povall had told Ms Thompson how she had done so much for people, she replied “‘this is what makes me the most’, these are her words,” said Ms Chopra-Povall.

Reflecting on the time she spent with Ms Thompson as a manager, she said, “She had the kind of ability to step back and let you do it, because you had to do it and you had to learn. If I kept asking her “Elaine, can you help me, can you help me?” She recognized him and pulled back and just let me do it.

“She had the ability to give the reins and really trust me and she did it, it was great that she had enough confidence in my ability to do that, and she saw me grow up. something we joked about afterward, she knew what she was doing. “


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Mitchell native, advocate for mental health issues, says 988 suicide lifeline will be a game-changer https://dystonia-dreams.org/mitchell-native-advocate-for-mental-health-issues-says-988-suicide-lifeline-will-be-a-game-changer/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 04:22:13 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/mitchell-native-advocate-for-mental-health-issues-says-988-suicide-lifeline-will-be-a-game-changer/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – “It’s a disease of the mind, it’s a chemical imbalance in your brain,” said Becky Scheig, who grew up in Mitchell and now lives in the Minneapolis area. Scheig and her husband Bill know what it’s like to care for someone with mental health issues and suicidal thoughts. They noticed […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – “It’s a disease of the mind, it’s a chemical imbalance in your brain,” said Becky Scheig, who grew up in Mitchell and now lives in the Minneapolis area.

Scheig and her husband Bill know what it’s like to care for someone with mental health issues and suicidal thoughts. They noticed that their son Andrew was having difficulty starting in elementary school. At first it was obsessive-compulsive disorder.

“He was very worried about germs, he washed his hands a lot, he wouldn’t touch the things that bothered him, like if we went to the gas station and filled up with gasoline, the fumes would make him sick,” Scheig said.

As Andrew got older they saw some big changes.

“You could see the anxiety in him was just horrible and we took him back to a psychologist and he was diagnosed with OCD and severe depression and the depression was coming on, he knew those thoughts he was having wasn ‘ were not normal thoughts, ”Scheig said. .

At one point, Andrew’s anxiety got so severe that he had thoughts of suicide. Becky and her husband worked to get Andrew the help he needed, whether it was advice on the right medication or a half-day treatment plan, and he walked away. well come out… for a while.

“In grade 8 with therapy and drugs he was doing really well, I mean it was a game changer, you know it’s great, but with mental health and addiction it just doesn’t go away. You know you have to learn to manage your disease and that’s what it is, it’s a disease, ”Scheig said.

Andrew died of an accidental overdose at the age of 19.

“I went to wake him up, he didn’t want to wake up but Andrew took medicine to help him sleep because he had these ruminating thoughts all the time, so he was prescribed medicine to help him sleep. . And he didn’t wake up and then I felt his face and it was cold to the touch. Bill, my husband happened to be at home, and as you know he’s a doctor, he was waiting for me in the car and I ran to get him and he got down and he was dead for a while. So, was it suicide? Unforeseen. accidental overdose yes, but did his sanity cause it? Absoutely.”

Janet Kittams of the Helpline Center in Sioux Falls says no parent should have to go through what the Scheigs did. She believes that one of the biggest benefits of the helpline, besides ease of use, is the impact it will have on the stigma surrounding mental illness.

“I think when 988 is promoted nationally it really becomes that easy access point for mental health issues, it’s just going to make it mundane for people to ask for help to reduce this.” stigma, Kittams said.

Becky agrees that stigma is a problem, she talks to groups and works to educate others, all the while remembering the struggles Andrew worked so hard to overcome.

“Would he have thought of calling a crisis hotline?” I do not know, maybe. But if that’s what’s available to anyone who needs it. You know, and not having to look for the number like now, I don’t even know it’s like a fit or anything, so 988 is going to be a huge difference, I think, ”Scheig said.

By July 16 of next year, by dialing “988”, your call will be routed to the National Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Lifeline. Some systems are already in the process of upgrading to “988”. Sending SMS for help will also be available.


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Research leads to series of short films exploring mental health in India https://dystonia-dreams.org/research-leads-to-series-of-short-films-exploring-mental-health-in-india/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 08:19:37 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/research-leads-to-series-of-short-films-exploring-mental-health-in-india/ Residents of Kerala state in southwest India shared their experiences and understanding of living with mental illnesses for a research project led by De Montfort University Leicester (DMU). MeHeLP India is a collaborative international interdisciplinary partnership that examines the applicability and promotion of mental health literacy (MHL) in urban and rural communities, using participatory theater, […]]]>

Residents of Kerala state in southwest India shared their experiences and understanding of living with mental illnesses for a research project led by De Montfort University Leicester (DMU).

MeHeLP India is a collaborative international interdisciplinary partnership that examines the applicability and promotion of mental health literacy (MHL) in urban and rural communities, using participatory theater, storytelling practices and short films.

As part of MeHeLP India, which aims to increase MHL to millions of people in India, researchers asked people in Kerala to consider the social, economic and cultural factors that impact their mental health.

They then asked people to share their stories on film, with the aim of raising awareness in urban, rural and tribal communities about poor mental health, as well as the stigma and discrimination associated with it.

“Our goal for this work is to identify the best way to build mental health support that is culturally relevant for specific communities. In this case, for people living in Kerala, ”explained Prof. Raghu Raghavan, head of MeHeLP India and professor of mental health at DMU.

“We wanted to work with communities and increase overall awareness of HLM in the context of Kerala. significantly. “

MeHeLP India’s work in Kerala has resulted in a range of innovative interactive drama productions and short films that tell stories of real people and explore various themes related to the promotion of MHL.

The films were presented at a dedicated “Kerala” and “Pan India” conference organized by MeHeLP India, where researchers were able to connect and meet a number of leading academic institutions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) across the ‘India, to share their work.

Among the dignitaries present were Ms Veena George, Minister of Health of the State of Kerala and Prof. Mohanan Kunnummel, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Health of Kerala, as well as speakers from Tata Trusts, Sangath India, Public Health Foundation of India, Schizophrenia Research Foundation India, Mariwala Health Initiative and the Live Love Laugh Foundation (initiated by famous Bollywood actress, Deepika Padukone).

The project also engaged the general public beyond the local communities involved in theatrical interventions to examine their own mental health skills with a range of lived experience-focused campaigns channeled through social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

MeHeLP India November 21

“We now have a repository of reusable mental health knowledge learning materials that reach a wider audience across India,” continued Prof Raghavan. “We know that using creative art forms to tell people’s stories can help others gain new knowledge and develop skills for their own mental health and well-being.

“We are already seeing these films being absorbed into the curriculum of universities based in Kerala and elsewhere, as well as being used for training health professionals and frontline workers as well.”

Researchers decided to work in Kerala for a number of reasons: it has a 100% literacy rate, the health index is comparable to that of western countries, and its life expectancy rate is higher than in the other states of India.

However, Kerala also has a higher percentage of mental illness compared to the rest of India and suicide rates are double the national average, which means the state has the highest suicide rate in the world. country.

Mrs Veena George, Minister of Health of the State of Kerala, said: “When it comes to mental health problems, the majority of our population cannot identify symptoms and disorders and do not use methods. evidence-based to deal with it. We need to examine why this is happening.

“Lack of awareness of mental health and mental illness has been cited as the reason. Along with this, there are many misconceptions related to mental illness. This is where MHL becomes important.

“Only a small percentage of people with mental health issues are able to get help and the absence of MHL poses a challenge as it prevents people from seeking mental health services at the right time.

“We have to make sure that mental health care is accessible to many more people. That is why our government plans to give mental health the same priority.

MeHeLP India is led by DMU alongside partners from Loughborough University, University College London (UCL), Middlesex University, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Indian National Institute of Mental Health and neuroscience (NIMHANS) and NGOs in India.

Launched in 2018 and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), MeHeLP India’s main goal is to raise awareness about mental health in rural and urban areas. communities through forms of theater, film and storytelling.

Posted on Monday, November 22, 2021


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Families and mental health professionals call for COVID-19 research https://dystonia-dreams.org/families-and-mental-health-professionals-call-for-covid-19-research/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 10:08:08 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/families-and-mental-health-professionals-call-for-covid-19-research/ STRONGSVILLE – When her 17-year-old son Brycen Gray’s symptoms quickly worsened, his mother, Tara Gray, was unaware he had COVID-19. Come to think of it, the Strongsville resident believes he contracted the virus between April 16 and April 18, while he was with his high school friends – almost a week before he killed himself. […]]]>

STRONGSVILLE – When her 17-year-old son Brycen Gray’s symptoms quickly worsened, his mother, Tara Gray, was unaware he had COVID-19.

Come to think of it, the Strongsville resident believes he contracted the virus between April 16 and April 18, while he was with his high school friends – almost a week before he killed himself.

Education:Substitute Teacher Hiring Process, NEXUS Pipeline Fund discussed by Chippewa School Board

Gray said her son, who had never been diagnosed with a mental illness, died after the infectious virus caused him to develop a psychiatric illness.

“Looking back is 2020,” Gray said. “If I had known he had COVID-19 and that this was going to be our fate and we had had more information, I would never have left him at home alone.”

Almost seven months after his death, Gray’s family are requesting federal research funds to study COVID-19 and its mental health and neurological effects on the human body.

“Brycen wasn’t depressed. There was no sign. I know kids can hide it,” Gray said. “It rocked everyone.”

‘It’s a nightmare’

Brycen Gray (right) poses with his niece.

When her son first fell ill on Monday April 19, she was not surprised.

Earlier today, he had received his second BioNTech Pfizer vaccine and she expected him to feel sick as after his first injection.

But every day his condition deteriorated.

On Wednesday, he couldn’t taste or smell, quickly developed a fever and had severe diarrhea – common symptoms of the coronavirus. While he could sleep, he neither ate nor drank, she said.


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Kaiser Permanente nurses and mental health staff to strike in solidarity with engineers on Friday https://dystonia-dreams.org/kaiser-permanente-nurses-and-mental-health-staff-to-strike-in-solidarity-with-engineers-on-friday/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 14:13:50 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/kaiser-permanente-nurses-and-mental-health-staff-to-strike-in-solidarity-with-engineers-on-friday/ After a sympathy strike on Thursday left some Kaiser Permanente patients without care on Thursday, thousands of mental health nurses and clinicians will also come out on Friday in solidarity with the striking engineers. “Nurses know the devastating impact of the staff shortage on the health and well-being of our community,” said CNA President Cathy […]]]>

After a sympathy strike on Thursday left some Kaiser Permanente patients without care on Thursday, thousands of mental health nurses and clinicians will also come out on Friday in solidarity with the striking engineers.

“Nurses know the devastating impact of the staff shortage on the health and well-being of our community,” said CNA President Cathy Kennedy, RN at Kaiser in Roseville. “We also know that to provide patients with the safe care our communities need and deserve, we need to be able to count on our colleagues and they must be able to count on us. We are therefore at the side of Kaiser’s engineers in their just fight for a safe and fair workplace. “

About 20,000 nurses and thousands of mental health professionals, represented by the National Union of Health Workers, will be picketing between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. at selected medical centers in the Bay Area. Sympathy strikers will also gather outside Kaiser’s Oakland headquarters at noon.

The engineers, represented by IUOE Stationary Engineers, Local 39, who help maintain various systems in hospitals, medical centers and other buildings, have been on strike since their contract expired on September 17 in the goal of obtaining higher wages. Kaiser said engineers earn more than $ 180,000 in combined wages and benefits, and union leaders are asking for “unreasonable increases” beyond what other unions have asked for.

“I know they describe it as if we were paid this huge amount of money,” said Elaine Lopez, picket, biomedical engineer at Kaiser San Jose. “This is the Bay Area, living here is not cheap. All we ask is what is right. We are not asking for more than that. Just what everyone in this field gets paid in our profession.

Mental health professionals, who also work on a contract that expired Oct. 1, say Kaiser rejected proposals to increase staffing and hire more minority and bilingual therapists to reduce the number of ‘unsustainable’ cases in clinics. Kaiser employees say clients are forced to wait one to three months for a follow-up treatment appointment.

Mickey Fitzpatrick, a psychologist at Kaiser Pleasanton, said the next available appointment for patients would not be until January.

“We are sorely understaffed and have workloads in excess of the hundreds,” he said. “We have no limit to our workloads. It is unethical to force clients to wait one to two months, sometimes three months for therapy appointments and it is incongruous with their standard of care which suggests that therapy is effective, that clients are seen. at intervals of one to two weeks.

Long wait times could have serious repercussions on patients, including death, according to some mental health professionals.

“A month is a very long time,” said Joanna Manqueros, therapist at Kaiser Oakland. “Depression is a serious mental health problem and just like an untreated diabetic or an untreated person with severe heart disease, the serious ramifications can include death and this is true for many mental health problems that we treat. “

Fitzpatrick said the “vast majority” of NUHW members would support a strike if it came to that.

Friday’s sympathy strike comes after tens of thousands of Kaiser union workers in the Bay Area, Central Valley and Sacramento, from radiology technicians to housekeepers, withdrew in sympathy, leaving the healthcare giant scrambles to find backups and patients with longer wait times and in some cases no service at all.

Kaiser said in a statement he was negotiating with Local 39 on Tuesday and Wednesday, but still finds himself in a stalemate over wages.

“We are optimistic about our ability to resolve the remaining issues with Local 39 at the bargaining table and reach a deal that continues to reward our employees and support the affordability of healthcare, just as we do. have done with several unions this week, ”Kaiser said.

In the meantime, Kaiser said some locations with laboratory, optometry and radiology services and some outpatient pharmacies will be closed or operate at reduced hours this week during sympathy strikes. “Non-urgent” medical procedures or appointments could also be rescheduled or postponed.

The healthcare provider said he wonders why union leaders have encouraged sympathy strikes and that this “will not bring us any closer to a deal and, more importantly, it is unfair for our members and patients to disrupt their care when they need it most. employees to be there for them.

Union leaders said Kaiser has enough money to fund the resources of medical centers, which are faltering under pressure from insufficient staff during the pandemic.

“Kaiser has the resources to be the best place to give and receive behavioral health care, but he was chosen to be the star child of uneven and unethical care,” said Sal Rosselli, president of the NUHW. “Kaiser’s refusal to even consider proposals to increase staff and improve care shows that it is not serious to work with clinicians to fix your mental health care system.”


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Panel offers solutions to Colorado’s youth mental health crisis https://dystonia-dreams.org/panel-offers-solutions-to-colorados-youth-mental-health-crisis/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 15:03:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/panel-offers-solutions-to-colorados-youth-mental-health-crisis/ Not abandoning federal and state lawmakers, the Colorado Children’s Hospital hosted another roundtable to get the message across that action must be taken immediately to address the growing crisis in young patient mental health. In June, Children’s held similar talks, officially declaring a state of emergency due to an increase in youth suicide attempts and […]]]>

Not abandoning federal and state lawmakers, the Colorado Children’s Hospital hosted another roundtable to get the message across that action must be taken immediately to address the growing crisis in young patient mental health.

In June, Children’s held similar talks, officially declaring a state of emergency due to an increase in youth suicide attempts and emergency rooms filling up with young psychiatric patients awaiting appropriate treatment. .

The most recent roundtable, held virtually on November 16, continued discussions of the growing crisis, and this time the Aurora-based hospital system – with campuses in Highlands Ranch and Broomfield and facilities in the Denver subway – came equipped with solutions, as he unveiled his “Guide to Child and Youth Mental Health.”

To create the playbook, Children’s collaborated with Healthier Colorado, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Colorado Education Association, Partners for Children’s Mental Health, and the Colorado Association for School-Based Health Care.

Jake Williams, executive director of Healthier Colorado, said suicide should not be the leading cause of death in children.

Healthier Colorado is a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to bringing the voices of Coloradans to the public policy process to improve the health of residents of the state.

Williams, as well as a panel of speakers at the Nov. 16 forum, said local, state and federal lawmakers must step up to address the growing mental health crisis that has only been exacerbated by the pandemic.

Colorado, like many states, suffers from a severe shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists and psychologists, leading to gaps in access to care for children and youth, according to the manual. The playbook estimates that only 22% of mentally ill youth with severe disabilities receive care.

Jim Weigand, a father of seven from Jefferson County, participated in the discussions, sharing a story about his adopted daughter who struggled with mental health. Wiegand said that in order to get the right care for her daughter, her family had to seek outside Colorado, placing her in a facility in Georgia.

Wiegand said the Georgia facility has helped her daughter for 15 months, forcing the family to move to see her with the additional hurdles created by the pandemic.

Wiegand said his daughter was now home and doing well, but pointed out how frustrating it was to get help in Colorado. Weigand said he was lucky his family could afford to take the steps they took, noting that he has friends in similar situations where their children are not receiving proper assistance.

Dr Sophie Meharena, of Every Child Pediatrics, a section of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said the system was overwhelmed. Meharena described a Friday afternoon when four of her 16 patients told her they were having thoughts of suicide.

Meharena said parents are overwhelmed with not knowing what to do and the industry is overwhelmed because it does not have the facilities, resources or manpower to deal with the ever-increasing number of patients requiring a mental health intervention.

“Without coordinated and coherent resources and access for all, we cannot have a sustainable system,” Meharena said. “Good mechanics are the key to a durable system to meet Colorado’s needs. Investing in children’s mental health is investing in the future of this country.

By presenting solutions to the problem, the manual points to local policy changes that should include more federal funding with local impact and more local infrastructure for sustainable funding.

The panel pointed to funds coming from the US federal bailout law of 2021, where millions have been earmarked for states to be used for mental health. Panel members are calling on Colorado lawmakers to designate one-third, or $ 150 million, of all funds for youth mental health. The state got $ 450 million from the US bailout.

Williams said that was a reasonable amount given that Colorado youth and young adults under the age of 24 make up 31% of the state’s population.

Zach Zaslow, director of government affairs at Children’s, said the funding couldn’t stop with the US bailout. For the real changes in Colorado, Zaslow said lawmakers at the state and federal level must commit to addressing the crisis by creating sustainable programs and funding beyond 2021.

By creating sustainable programs, Zaslow said children and youth will be able to get the care they need before a crisis occurs.

Meharena said part of the problem is that the system is designed to be responsive rather than proactive.

As part of the solution, the multi-agency playbook calls on state policies to prioritize child and youth mental health through continued federal funding investments and ensure the new Behavioral Health Administration is child-oriented.

Other solutions discussed by the panel include pushing lawmakers to change the way the healthcare system separates physical and mental health. Currently, CHC Chief Medical Officer Dr David Brumbaugh said the way insurance companies deal with mental health makes it difficult for families to afford proper care.

Creating more virtual options for rural communities is also a solution, Zaslow said.

Rebecca Doughty – program director for Four Corners Youth Clinics, a member of the Colorado Association of School Health Clinics – said the shortage of trained psychologists and staff is a major problem in rural communities.

Zaslow said having the ability to speak to trained professionals without having to drive to Aurora would help help struggling youth beyond the Front Range.

Dr Jenna Glover, a clinical child psychologist, said the manual presented by the panel offers tangible information that will show lawmakers how they can begin to fix a faulty system.

Glover and panelists are urging the public to push lawmakers at all levels to start making mental health care for young people a priority.


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We can’t forget mental health in this nation’s abortion debate https://dystonia-dreams.org/we-cant-forget-mental-health-in-this-nations-abortion-debate/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 20:53:48 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/we-cant-forget-mental-health-in-this-nations-abortion-debate/ As a certified obstetrician / gynecologist who has practiced for almost 20 years, I want to address an issue that seems to have been overlooked in the debate about access to abortion: the mental health issues surrounding pregnancy. We talk a lot about bans and restrictions on abortion as a physical health issue, but they […]]]>

As a certified obstetrician / gynecologist who has practiced for almost 20 years, I want to address an issue that seems to have been overlooked in the debate about access to abortion: the mental health issues surrounding pregnancy. We talk a lot about bans and restrictions on abortion as a physical health issue, but they also have a profound impact on the life of a pregnant person. mental health.

My dad was also OB / GYN. He shared stories of women who died in his care due to complications from illegal abortions before Roe v. Wade. I now speak on behalf of my patients. I am not speaking on behalf of my employer.

Mental health awareness and support is a big part of my OB / GYN practice. We all know about postpartum depression, but I’m referring to other aspects of mental health.

Over the years, I have treated patients with a wide variety of conditions. I have treated women with anxiety and depression. I have treated patients with bipolar disorder and they are afraid of passing these genes on to a child. If they were to conceive, termination seems to be their only option, for the mental health well-being of the next generation. I help women cope with the grief of stillbirth and the fear of being pregnant again and losing another baby. I have counseled patients who have had to terminate much desired pregnancies because the mother would die due to health problems exacerbated by the pregnancy.

I am grateful to practice in Colorado where we can safely provide termination options for patients up to 24 weeks pregnant. But as I keep a close eye on what’s going on in Texas and on the Supreme Court, I had to speak up. I am not an abortionist. But on behalf of my patients, I am so grateful that I can refer them to safe, well-trained physicians when termination of pregnancy is the right answer.

We are all aware of the opioid crisis in our country. If a person is pregnant and does not want to be, they can self-medicate with drugs and alcohol, which harms themselves and the fetus. If a person cannot afford to support a child and is forced to carry the pregnancy, what is best for the child?

Especially for people who have underlying mental health issues, forcing them to become pregnant would likely exacerbate any mental health issues: anxiety, depression, reactivation of past trauma, substance abuse, etc.

Being able to give a child up for adoption is a very difficult choice for many people. And let’s not forget that planning to give a child up for adoption requires the person to go through pregnancy and childbirth. Childbirth can be life threatening to both mother and fetus. I respect my patient’s choice not to risk her own life for a baby she does not want or cannot care for. For some people, pressure from their community or family members may cause them to choose to keep a child, at their own expense.

In a recent analysis of maternal mortality by the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE), the most common causes of the 145 pregnancy-related deaths between 2008 and 2013 were injuries (44) and mental health problems ( 40); in fact, these two causes accounted for nearly six in ten maternal deaths. “Maternal mortality” statistics include the first year after the birth of a baby.

And please don’t start with the ‘if they don’t want kids, they shouldn’t have sex’ argument – Texas’ new ban doesn’t provide an exemption for rape or incest. Thanks not imply that these people volunteered for their abuse or attack.

I need to have all the options available to treat my patients safely, no matter what they look like. Period.

Restrictions on abortion place unnecessary stress on patients who are already going through an emotional roller coaster ride surrounding pregnancy and parenthood. Neither patients nor doctors need politicians to look over their shoulders and make personal decisions for them at a time when they are under enormous physical and emotional pressure.


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