Mental health – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:16:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dystonia-dreams.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70x70.jpg Mental health – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ 32 32 70% of women have mental health issues during pregnancy https://dystonia-dreams.org/70-of-women-have-mental-health-issues-during-pregnancy/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 12:28:59 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/70-of-women-have-mental-health-issues-during-pregnancy/ Pregnancy changes the brain in profound and lasting ways, affecting brain physiology, mood, and behavior Neuroscience 2022The annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world’s largest source of emerging information on brain science and health, presented new findings on how pregnancy changes the brain in very significant ways. In fact, maternal mental health […]]]>

Pregnancy changes the brain in profound and lasting ways, affecting brain physiology, mood, and behavior

Neuroscience 2022The annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world’s largest source of emerging information on brain science and health, presented new findings on how pregnancy changes the brain in very significant ways.

In fact, maternal mental health issues are extremely common among pregnant women and new mothers.

Of the approximately 3.5 million people who give birth each year in the United States, approximately 20% will be affected by mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. These diseases can have a negative impact on parents, babies, families and society if left untreated.

Research into how pregnancy alters the brain is beginning to reveal the neural mechanisms underlying adaptive changes and perinatal mental illness.

Postpartum depression: risk biomarkers and therapeutic targets

Susceptibility or resilience to postpartum depression in a rodent model is associated with changes in neuroimmune markers and hormones that could serve as risk biomarkers or possible therapeutic targets for the disease.

Factors that regulate gene expression in learning and memory networks may mediate long-term effects of maternal experience in mouse brains.

The long-lasting antidepressant effects of allopregnanolone in postpartum depression may be due to effects on the coordination of activity in brain regions involved in mood.

“The neuroscience findings presented today touch on different aspects of the transition to motherhood at multiple levels of investigation and in various brain areas,” says session moderator Jodi Pawluski, neuroscientist and psychotherapist.

“An important insight into the neuroscience of parenting”

“These investigations of the maternal brain provide important insights into the neuroscience of parenthood and have implications for targeting and treat perinatal mental illness.”

Pregnancy changes the brain – how?

According to research, nearly 70% of women experience some of these symptoms within weeks of giving birth:

© Denys Dolnikov

Tests on rats identified vulnerability to postpartum anhedonia

Individual female rats showed variable susceptibility to postpartum anhedonia; those with postpartum anhedonia were also more anxious and less likely to care for their puppies.

Scientists found that rats susceptible to postpartum anhedonia had altered levels of certain neuroimmune factors and hormones compared to unaffected animals. This suggests that it may be possible to identify biomarkers that predict the risk of postpartum depression and that could serve as new therapeutic targets for the disease.

Ultimately, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying how pregnancy, childcare, and stressful experiences interact to produce long-term changes in brain health is limited.

However, studies have shown that mice that have given birth perform better on spatial learning tasks and display profoundly different gene expression patterns in the hippocampus, a brain structure essential for learning and memory, compared to mice that have been given birth. mice that have not given birth.

Chronic stress during the postpartum period, on the other hand, completely inhibits these adaptive changes.

Brexanolone (allopregnanolone) approved for the treatment of postpartum depression

Brexanolone (allopregnanolone) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of postpartum depression. Indeed, the drug provides long-lasting antidepressant effects, but how it works is still poorly understood.

In mice, for example, allopregnanolone appears to regulate the coordination of neural activity across brain networks involved in mood and emotional processing.

The flow of information through these brain networks is disrupted by chronic stress, a major risk factor for depression and anxiety, but may be partially restored by treatment with allopregnanolone, providing a possible mechanism for the antidepressant effects. drug persistence.

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CNU receives grant to support student mental health services – Daily Press https://dystonia-dreams.org/cnu-receives-grant-to-support-student-mental-health-services-daily-press/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 12:57:10 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/cnu-receives-grant-to-support-student-mental-health-services-daily-press/ NEWPORT NEWPORT – Christopher Newport University has received a grant that will enable it to expand mental health care services to students. The grant, of $100,000 per year for two years, was awarded by the Virginia State Board of Higher Education in consultation with the Virginia Health Care Foundation. He will pay the salary and […]]]>

NEWPORT NEWPORT – Christopher Newport University has received a grant that will enable it to expand mental health care services to students.

The grant, of $100,000 per year for two years, was awarded by the Virginia State Board of Higher Education in consultation with the Virginia Health Care Foundation. He will pay the salary and benefits of two resident counselors on site. The university will hire, train, and supervise licensed clinical social worker or licensed professional counselor candidates until they are licensed.

“This unique pilot program will serve the dual purpose of expanding mental health services to students, while simultaneously increasing the mental health workforce pipeline by providing supervised clinical hours for candidates wishing to become LCSWs or LPCs,” according to a university press release. .

In addition to the two grant-funded counselors, a college match will allow the clinic to hire and train a third counselor, school officials said.

“We’re so grateful because this is going to give us a chance to help more students and get them into it much faster,” said Bill Ritchey, psychologist and executive director of health and counseling services at the University. ‘university. Ritchey estimates the grant will allow their campus clinic to serve approximately 200 additional students.

Ritchey said statistics show between 20 and 40 percent of college students struggle with a mental health issue. Anxiety and stress are especially prevalent on college campuses.

The additional clinicians mean students will also be able to access services more quickly, which is especially important in a rapidly changing academic environment, Ritchey said.

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The Higher Education Mental Health Workforce Pilot Grant seeks to address the fact that 70% of Virginia is designated by the federal government as an area of ​​shortage of mental health professionals.

Ritchey said being able to see more students on campus also “lightens the load” on community providers because the university doesn’t have to turn away as many students.

Ritchey said increased demand is a contributing factor to the shortage of mental health care providers. Part of the demand, he said, comes from the declining stigma around seeking mental health support.

“Before, you had to be really, really, really badly off to access resources, and now the bar is much different in terms of wanting access,” he said.

This grant follows the General Assembly earlier this year which allocated $500,000 per year for the next two years to support this mental health workforce pilot project. In addition to Christopher Newport, George Mason, James Madison, Longwood, Radford and Virginia Tech will receive a grant.

“We are delighted to support the Commonwealth’s efforts to increase the mental health workforce pipeline, and honored to be selected by SCHEV to participate in this pilot program,” said the vice president of student affairs at the CNU, Kevin Hughes, in a press release. “We look forward to working with talented clinicians who will help our students meet the various challenges they face. »

Nour Habib, nour.habib@virginiamedia.com

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Taylor Swift, Lizzo and others are changing mental health messaging https://dystonia-dreams.org/taylor-swift-lizzo-and-others-are-changing-mental-health-messaging/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 17:02:41 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/taylor-swift-lizzo-and-others-are-changing-mental-health-messaging/ In this video, Amanda Calhoun, MD, MPH, of the Yale Child Study Center at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, highlights celebrities who have opened up about mental health issues and how medical professionals can integrate these stories into the education of professionals and patients. Calhoun and his colleague recently wrote an article […]]]>

In this video, Amanda Calhoun, MD, MPH, of the Yale Child Study Center at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, highlights celebrities who have opened up about mental health issues and how medical professionals can integrate these stories into the education of professionals and patients. Calhoun and his colleague recently wrote an article in University psychiatry on the positive effect of self-disclosure of mental illness by celebrities.

Here is a transcript of his remarks:

It’s so interesting, you know, not only the album [Taylor Swift’s “Midnights“] herself quite monumental in the themes she talks about – in regards to the new Taylor Swift album – but also the responses on Twitter to the new Taylor Swift album have been amazing, and I’ve definitely been following that too.

She talks about having a eating disorder, weight wrestling, and even particular lines from her album have been taken down by fans and retweeted. She also talks about depression. I know there’s a line where she kind of compares her depression to a shift at the cemetery, and that really got to a lot of people, and thinking about how depression can be related to insomnia and sleepless nights and sort of disrupting your sleep-wake cycle, which is very much related to depression.

I feel like not only was the album itself very monumental, when it comes to talking about mental health issues and topics in an artful and creative way, but I was also very happy to see how well it resonated with fans and how much they really listen to the lyrics and the symbolism behind those lyrics.

People even retweeted things like ‘This resonated a lot with me and my depression or my eating disorder’ or ‘I see myself in this album. I was listening to this and crying at night. So that really resonated with the fans, and I think that’s really, really important.

Another celebrity I want to highlight that I’ve been a big fan of was Lizzo. Lizzo, who is currently on tour, has done so much for body positivity and talking about anti-black racism and transphobia and so many things. I mean, his tour, which I went to see, was literally like therapy; I felt like I was in therapy during his tour. She was talking about how special everyone is and [to] love and esteem you, so celebrities are doing a lot of amazing things, and I’m so excited to see what they continue to do and think about ways psychiatrists can continue to partner with them.

Megan Thee Stallion has a whole online platform now. One of the things that I really like about her website is that on the website you can actually search for various therapists especially for black people. [and] Black patients. It’s a real problem for minority patients not being able to find therapists from their background, not just for black people, but for other people of color, LGBTQ, people from predominantly minority and marginalized backgrounds often seek out therapists who have this background, or have expertise in working with people from their background.

So what I really love about Megan Thee Stallion’s platform is that it’s about empowering women to be a strong woman and an amazing woman while seeking therapy. That it’s good as a woman, especially as a black woman, where… personally, as a black woman, I represent less than 2% of psychiatrists. So there is a real need for more black therapists, and often black patients are looking for a black therapist, but they don’t know how to find us. So I love that she has so many resources to seek therapy.

There’s a lot of emphasis, I guess, on the negative impact of talking about mental health in the media and even among celebrities. Like “Oh, you’re spreading misinformation” and “What if you’re inappropriately portraying mental illness?” and just all these things that are very real issues in the media and things that we have to consider, like, are we actually putting out good information? But there’s actually a lot of really positive things about what celebrities are doing with their platforms.

In the newspaper, we are talking about several celebrities revealing a mental illness. So in the newspaper we talked about Demi Lovato and people like that, where after you kind of revealed they had a mental illness, you actually saw not just an increase in help-seeking behaviors, but a decrease in how the general public [negatively] seen people with mental illnesses. So I think it’s really, really important.

I think there are also a lot of benefits to using these celebrities as role models and connecting with our patients. When we talk about mental illnesses with children or teenagers, in particular, comparing them to the celebrities that exist, to the platforms that exist. Basically, using all the positives of celebrities, and all the kids, teens, and adults who look up to those celebrities, and basically saying, “Hey, here’s an example of someone approving that they have a mental illness, or which has a platform that de-stigmatizes mental illness. The AS have you seen? What do you think?’ So it can be a very good way to talk to patients.

I think there’s a lot to learn and a lot to do with celebrities when it comes to partnering. And I think sometimes, you know, psychiatry can be a siled field. We can kind of be in our psychiatry bubble. So it can be this mystical thing; nobody knows what’s going on, like ‘What is psychiatry? What do we do?’ So I also think that by partnering with celebrities, we can share accurate information in a way that can be widely disseminated. And also to share that we have normal conversations; psychiatrists and our psychiatric patients are ordinary people. We have fun, we talk about things, it’s not that spooky, mystical stuff.

I think we still have a lot of work to do, but I’ve been pretty optimistic about the new generations to come. I think there seems to be a lot more discussion about mental health in a positive, specific light that I co-sign a lot.

  • Emilie Hutto is an associate video producer and editor for MedPage Today. She is based in Manhattan.

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The oversimplification of mental health https://dystonia-dreams.org/the-oversimplification-of-mental-health/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 01:24:23 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/the-oversimplification-of-mental-health/ We’ve all heard people within our social circle say things like, “I’m so OCD!” “I think I’m narcissistic” or “She’s so bipolar.” Many of us casually use these psychological diagnosis terms to label ourselves or others, but the question remains: do we actually know what the diagnosis entails? People are more aware of various psychopathologies […]]]>

We’ve all heard people within our social circle say things like, “I’m so OCD!” “I think I’m narcissistic” or “She’s so bipolar.” Many of us casually use these psychological diagnosis terms to label ourselves or others, but the question remains: do we actually know what the diagnosis entails?

People are more aware of various psychopathologies or illnesses due to informative mental health content on social media. But with easy access to mental health information, there is the danger of oversimplifying mental health issues and self-diagnosing tendencies that can harm our well-being.

During my teenage years, I was afraid of being judged, I had difficulty interacting with strangers and I was afraid of humiliating myself. I had even researched all the symptoms and convinced myself that I had social anxiety disorder. I never went for a psychiatric diagnosis or sought help from a therapist. Instead, I just labeled myself as someone with anxiety, and at times almost wore it as a badge of honor.

Years later, when I became a mental health professional, I realized that I did NOT have the disorder. I still remember the idea my supervisor gave me – for any of these symptom clusters to qualify as a disorder, it must be pervasive and persistent.

The question to ask would be, my supervisor informed me, does the disorder affect daily functioning at school, work, with family and friends? If so, the problem is considered pervasive. And how often do the symptoms appear? A month? Or at least two weeks? If it repeats, the problem is considered persistent.

I had social anxiety as a teenager, but put simply, it just wasn’t a disorder.

Over the past three years, the pandemic has had a detrimental impact on mental health, resulting in a marked increase in the number of adolescents and young adults using social media/online information to diagnose themselves with various types of mental illnesses.

While easy access to mental health information has led many people to seek the help they need, it has also led many to self-identify as having a disorder or illness without getting professional evaluation (as I did) and sometimes even resorting to ineffective or inappropriate treatments. .

As I mentioned before, we heard people around us say, “Such and such is so OCD. She wants everything to be in order in life” or “I think

I have OCD because I like a routine schedule”. But again, just because someone likes things a certain way doesn’t mean they have OCD. If the person can function normally despite this, it would be better to label them as being organized rather than having the disorder.

For a formal diagnosis to be made, the psychologist should consider the range of experiences the individual has had, which includes the interval between symptoms and their duration, whether the symptoms affect the person’s ability to function in the day . daily life, sleep, appetite, mood and motivation. For example, when a person is diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder, their compulsions are so debilitating that they cannot keep up with their studies or work effectively. Their obsessive thoughts would affect their relationships with loved ones so much that they would create distance and conflict between them.

Moreover, the danger of misdiagnosis always remains. People in different age groups may experience different symptoms for the same underlying disorder. For example, a child showing anger and aggression can mean depression, unlike the adult version, where symptoms can show as feeling weak and lacking energy.

However, we also cannot ignore all the positive impacts of social media on mental health. For many young people struggling with mental health issues, social media has also served as a safety net and place to feel a sense of belonging with others struggling with similar issues.

Social media is a great platform to get an idea of ​​the importance of mental health and various mental disorders. But if you think you have a mental health problem, an appointment with a psychiatrist, clinical psychologist, counselor or therapist would be the way to go.

It should also be noted that we do not need to have a mental disorder to speak to a mental health professional. In fact, it’s a huge myth that we need to get rid of. All individuals face challenges in their daily lives. Seeking counseling and therapy can help us deal with our stressors and get the emotional support we need.

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‘Every Brilliant Thing’ Play Sparks Mental Health Discussions https://dystonia-dreams.org/every-brilliant-thing-play-sparks-mental-health-discussions/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 04:57:55 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/every-brilliant-thing-play-sparks-mental-health-discussions/ FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — ‘Every Brilliant Thing’ is on view at the Vista Theater in the Tower District until November 19. The play was written by Duncan Macmillan and Jonny Donahoe. Under the direction of Miguel Gastelum, The Fools Collaborative brings the play to Fresno. The show’s goal is to eliminate the stigma surrounding mental […]]]>

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — ‘Every Brilliant Thing’ is on view at the Vista Theater in the Tower District until November 19.

The play was written by Duncan Macmillan and Jonny Donahoe.

Under the direction of Miguel Gastelum, The Fools Collaborative brings the play to Fresno.

The show’s goal is to eliminate the stigma surrounding mental health.

It’s especially timely because people are still struggling with mental health issues post-pandemic. Many also struggle with seasonal depression at this time of year.

Local actors Camille Gaston and Nick Haas alternately play the character. It’s a one-man show.

The piece contains descriptions of depression, self-harm and suicide. Audiences should keep this in mind and remember that the goal is to normalize discussion of the topic.

“It’s such a sensitive subject, but at the same time, we need to be able to talk openly about this subject and normalize that mental health issues are happening,” said Chris Roup, acting executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Health. mental illness (NAMI) Fresno. .

Tickets are on a paid donation system and can be purchased here.

If you or someone you know is in emotional distress or contemplating suicide, call National Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988 or 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Copyright © 2022 KFSN-TV. All rights reserved.

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People in mental health crisis need medical professionals, not cops – MSR News Online https://dystonia-dreams.org/people-in-mental-health-crisis-need-medical-professionals-not-cops-msr-news-online/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 16:40:30 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/people-in-mental-health-crisis-need-medical-professionals-not-cops-msr-news-online/ Pexels I urge all communities, especially black communities, to use 988 Prior to the introduction of 911, people in need of assistance dialed local 10-digit telephone numbers to reach police, fire or emergency services. Emergency medical responses were not widespread or commonly available. In many communities of color, transportation for emergency services was provided by […]]]>
Pexels

I urge all communities, especially black communities, to use 988

Prior to the introduction of 911, people in need of assistance dialed local 10-digit telephone numbers to reach police, fire or emergency services. Emergency medical responses were not widespread or commonly available.

In many communities of color, transportation for emergency services was provided by funeral home staff. Following a report calling for action to reduce the number of deaths and injuries nationwide to request an ambulance, 911 was put in place. The first call to 911 was made in February 1968.

In 1973, a new law, the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Act 1973 strengthened emergency services. The law was part of the Public Health Services Act providing federal guidelines and more than $300 million in funding to develop regional EMS systems across the United States.

This law included a new single national telephone number to call an ambulance: 911. Its implementation and use nationwide took several decades. In fact, it would be rare for someone not to know how to call 911 when someone is experiencing a medical emergency, including a mental health crisis, to activate emergency medical services.

While 911 is an invaluable service, when people dealing with a mental health crisis activate emergency services, it is armed law enforcement who respond, not medical professionals. This practice contrasts with responding to a physical health emergency.

Many officers are well trained and recognize that people in mental health crisis may not be able to respond to even simple directions, but many lack the skills and patience to provide assistance to those who are severely depressed, psychotic, suicidal, or acting strangely, creating a potentially high-risk scenario for a fatal encounter.

Data collected by The Washington Post revealed that 1,000 people are shot by police each year and that black men are more than twice as likely to be victimized as white men. Between 2015 and 2022, one in four fatal police shootings involved people with untreated mental illness.

Additionally, police are more likely to shoot and kill unarmed black men who show signs of mental illness than white men with similar behaviors. It is estimated that 44% of incarcerated people and 37% of incarcerated people have a mental health problem.

It is vital that fewer armed police respond to mental health emergencies. Recently, there has been a big step towards improving the safety of people in mental health crisis. On July 16, 2022, a new three-digit daily code, 988, went live.

988, like 911, is a new single national number that routes callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. A call to 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline will activate mental health crisis teams, not armed law enforcement officers. It is accessible to everyone.

I urge all communities, especially black communities, to use 988. If armed police are no longer the default responder, the number of fatal encounters of police officers interacting with people with mental illnesses not treated or experiencing a mental health crisis will decrease.

If people in mental health crisis are no longer restrained and placed in the back of a police cruiser, their risk of diversion from a health facility to a correctional facility will decrease. All of these factors will improve the health and well-being of Black communities and reduce the criminalization of mental illness.

988
12 News / YouTube / MGN

How does 988 work?

If you or a loved one is going through a mental health crisis, call or text 988. After you agree to the terms of service and answer “Yes” to connect, you’ll be able to text an advisor.

A veteran or military service member can text the Veterans Crisis Line at 838255.

For voice calls:

  • If the caller does not press a prompt, the call is routed to a local crisis center.
  • Press “1” to be directed to the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • Press “2” to be routed to the Spanish subnet.
  • Press “3” to be directed to services for LGBTAI+ youth.
  • If the local call center cannot answer, the call is routed to the national backup network.

Dr. Dionne Hart is board certified in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. She is an adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry at Mayo Clinic. In 2014, Dr. Hart was named Minnesota Psychiatrist of the Year. In 2017, she received the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Dr. Hart is an American Psychiatric Association delegate to the American Medical Association and a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Medical Association (NMA). Dr. Hart is Region 4 Chairman of the NMA Board of Directors and President of the African American Physicians Association of Minnesota. In 2020, the Minnesota Physician magazine named her one of Minnesota’s 100 Most Influential Health Leaders. Twitter/Instagram: @lildocd

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Chicago’s budget now supports more mental health services, right in the neighborhood https://dystonia-dreams.org/chicagos-budget-now-supports-more-mental-health-services-right-in-the-neighborhood/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/chicagos-budget-now-supports-more-mental-health-services-right-in-the-neighborhood/ Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, and it’s a source of pride for our great urban city. When communities come together to support their schools, their safety and their health, relationships are formed and a great city becomes more manageable, friendlier and more familiar. Our City of Neighborhoods status is one of the most powerful […]]]>

Chicago is a city of neighborhoods, and it’s a source of pride for our great urban city. When communities come together to support their schools, their safety and their health, relationships are formed and a great city becomes more manageable, friendlier and more familiar.

Our City of Neighborhoods status is one of the most powerful reasons Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced the Mental Health Equity Framework in 2019, when her administration sought to address the serious and growing need for health services. mental illness for Chicago residents. He called for a significant investment by the city in creating a network of 50 neighborhood mental health providers who would provide services to all residents, regardless of health insurance status, immigration status or their ability to pay.

And we’re here to tell you, as service providers serving our communities every day: the strategy is working.

Before the end of this year, the city plans to fund a mental health clinic in every Chicago neighborhood. The network, in 2022, will have served 60,000 inhabitants, compared to 3,600 inhabitants in 2019.

This massive expansion of mental health services coincided with a sevenfold increase in the city’s mental health budget, from $12 million in 2019 to $86 million in 2022.

As frontline providers in our communities, sometimes for decades, we see all too clearly the immense need for mental health services at all ages and in all parts of the city. Less resourced communities suffer more from years of disinvestment, but make no mistake about it: trauma, substance use disorders, social conditions that affect health, anxiety, depression – all of this runs through the neighborhood boundaries. Adverse conditions don’t really care where you live or how much money you have.

What matters, and what always has, is where and how quickly Chicagoans can get help, prevention, and long-term support.

Because of the trust we have built in our communities – through awareness, familiarity, convenience and more – our programs can truly connect with our neighbors. We can provide a range of mental health services to adults, young people and families in their own communities, often with people they know in their neighbourhood.

Here are two examples of how increased city funding has improved our ability to serve patients:

Alivio Medical Center, which has been providing behavioral health services in Chicago for 17 years, is now able to focus on integrating behavioral health into primary care and then expanding it. Alivio also now has a diverse group of bilingual and bicultural providers, including in our three school-based health centers. And Alivio was able to increase access to services for underinsured and financially challenged residents of South Lawndale and the Lower West Side.

Consider the case of a 28-year-old Latina who sought psychiatric and behavioral health services this spring due to a history of struggles at school, work and in relationships. She had no insurance or ability to pay, but now receives ongoing support to deal with anxiety, depression and attention deficit disorder. Her relationships and work performance have improved, as has her ability to manage her mental health symptoms.

At Habilitative Systems, Inc. on the West Side, city funding is supporting more services offered through a trauma-informed lens because addressing the impact that decades of disinvestment has had on communities is critically important. neighborhood residents.

Services include intensive family intervention, care management and therapeutic services for youth and adults with mental health issues and those at risk or in crisis. It is important to note that nearly half of the people employed at HabilitativeSystems live in the communities they serve.

With city funding, the Habilitative Systems team helped a patient who was seeking services due to severe anxiety and low self-esteem, providing her with therapy that helped her achieve her goals. back to school and manage anxiety symptoms. The patient had a history of trauma and, with the support of her therapist, was able to recognize the role of trauma in her life and learn to engage in the healing process.

Our city budget must continue to provide funds to support our vital work. Your neighbors depend on it.

Donald Dew is President and CEO of Habilitative Systems, Inc. Esther Corpuz is CEO of Alivio Medical Center.

The Sun-Times welcomes letters to the editor and editorials. See our guidelines.

The views and opinions expressed by contributors are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Chicago Sun-Times or any of its affiliates.

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Valley mental health professional offers tips for dealing with daylight saving time https://dystonia-dreams.org/valley-mental-health-professional-offers-tips-for-dealing-with-daylight-saving-time/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 20:07:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/valley-mental-health-professional-offers-tips-for-dealing-with-daylight-saving-time/ FISHERSVILLE, Va. (WHSV) – DST ends on Sunday, November 6. Everyone gets another hour of sleep when we “fall back”. It also means that for many people it will be dark on the way home from work. This change can be hard to get used to. For many, the time change leads to seasonal affective […]]]>

FISHERSVILLE, Va. (WHSV) – DST ends on Sunday, November 6. Everyone gets another hour of sleep when we “fall back”.

It also means that for many people it will be dark on the way home from work.

This change can be hard to get used to. For many, the time change leads to seasonal affective disorder.

Andrea Kendall, licensed clinical social worker at Augusta Health, says keeping a consistent schedule, practicing good sleep habits, working out, and relaxing time can help you make the change.

“It’s not a replacement for extra sunlight, but it’s important to be intentional about exposing yourself to the sun, even five or ten minutes a day, just bundle up and get outside, take some sunshine and some fresh air,” Kendall said.

While it’s always nice to get more sleep, a change in schedule can disrupt normal functioning. Give yourself time to adapt.

“It’s okay if it takes you about a month to get used to this change because we really deal with our worries and all those things with our routine and our structure and our predictability, so any change can be hard to accept,” she said. said.

However, if you don’t feel able to adjust during this time, talk to a doctor about what you’re going through. Kendall said they might recommend medication to help get through the winter months.

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Higher rate of new mental health diagnoses among ECMO survivors https://dystonia-dreams.org/higher-rate-of-new-mental-health-diagnoses-among-ecmo-survivors/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 20:00:18 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/higher-rate-of-new-mental-health-diagnoses-among-ecmo-survivors/ According to a recent study, critically ill patients who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) while hospitalized were at increased risk for new mental health diagnoses. An advanced form of resuscitation, ECMO provides temporary respiratory and/or cardiac support to patients and is often considered when conventional treatment fails. Researchers examined the association between patients who survive […]]]>

According to a recent study, critically ill patients who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) while hospitalized were at increased risk for new mental health diagnoses.

An advanced form of resuscitation, ECMO provides temporary respiratory and/or cardiac support to patients and is often considered when conventional treatment fails. Researchers examined the association between patients who survive after ECMO use and mental health diagnoses after discharge.

Researchers conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study from April 2010 to March 2020 with adult patients (n=4462) who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and ultimately discharged from the hospital. Of the total, 642 patients received ECMO (mean age, 50.7 years) and had a median follow-up of 730 days. A total of 3820 patients did not receive ECMO (mean age, 51 years) and had a median follow-up of 1390 days.

For the study, the researchers looked for a new post-discharge mental diagnosis that could be: a composite of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder; schizophrenia, other psychotic disorders; other mental health disorders; and social issues. Of the total number of patients who survived ECMO, 37% (n=236) received a new mental health diagnosis. Comparatively, 40.9% (n=1565) of patients who survived ECMO were diagnosed with a new mental health problem.

Overall, the researchers found a 24% higher rate of new mental health diagnoses in patients who received ECMO compared to intensive care patients who did not receive ECMO. There was no significant association between substance after discharge in people who received ECMO.

“The results of this current study show that diagnoses of new mental health conditions were common among survivors after ECMO,” the researchers concluded. “The most frequent diagnoses were related to depression, anxiety and traumatic disorders, which was not surprising given the invasive nature of intensive care. Such diagnoses are the most common among all adult survivors of critical illness…this work provides important insights for clinicians regarding psychological support for survivors after discharge.

—Jessica Ganga

Reference:

Fernando SM, Scott M, Talarico R, et al. Association of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with new mental health diagnoses in adult survivors of critical illness. JAMA. Published online October 26, 2022. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.17714

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Eastern Ontario Health Unit Launches Survey to Understand Community Mental Health Status https://dystonia-dreams.org/eastern-ontario-health-unit-launches-survey-to-understand-community-mental-health-status/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 20:56:40 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/eastern-ontario-health-unit-launches-survey-to-understand-community-mental-health-status/ During the months of October and November, the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU) uses telephone, email and in-person surveys to understand the mental health status of the population of region. Anonymous surveys will help the EOHU evaluate its current and future programs and services. Starting in November, if you live in the EOHU area, you […]]]>

During the months of October and November, the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU) uses telephone, email and in-person surveys to understand the mental health status of the population of region. Anonymous surveys will help the EOHU evaluate its current and future programs and services.

Starting in November, if you live in the EOHU area, you may receive a phone call from the research firm the EOHU has partnered with regarding the survey. EOHU staff also travel to various locations in the community to collect survey responses in person.

Topics covered by the survey include satisfaction with current access to and availability of mental health care, stress levels, coping and coping, mental illness and overall satisfaction with with regard to life. All responses collected by telephone and in-person surveys are anonymous and do not contain any personal information.

“The EOHU is committed to supporting not only the physical health of our community, but also its mental health, especially after the added stresses of the past few years,” shares Dr. Paul Roumeliotis, Medical Officer of Health at the EOHU. “This survey will tell us how our community is doing and identify areas where they may need more support. From there, we can plan and deliver the most effective programs possible.”

The survey results will be used to update the EOHU’s health indicators and mental health report, as well as in updating and creating its programming. The results will also be shared with EOHU community partners to help them plan and deliver their programs.

For more information on mental health, health indicators and programs offered by the EOHU, please visit BSEO.ca.

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