Mental health – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 01:07:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dystonia-dreams.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70x70.jpg Mental health – Dystonia Dreams http://dystonia-dreams.org/ 32 32 Rantz: Democratic board member opposes school safety and mental health https://dystonia-dreams.org/rantz-democratic-board-member-opposes-school-safety-and-mental-health/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:34:02 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/rantz-democratic-board-member-opposes-school-safety-and-mental-health/ When it comes to school shootings, Pierce County Councilman Jani Hitchen only wants to talk about guns. In a pithy and ill-argued op-ed for the Tacoma News Tribune, Hitchen dismisses basic school safety measures — many of which he is afforded as a board member. She says we shouldn’t focus on common mental issues among […]]]>

When it comes to school shootings, Pierce County Councilman Jani Hitchen only wants to talk about guns.

In a pithy and ill-argued op-ed for the Tacoma News Tribune, Hitchen dismisses basic school safety measures — many of which he is afforded as a board member. She says we shouldn’t focus on common mental issues among school shooters because that could create stigma. And she says the police are never the answer because, well, they don’t like them.

Most of his arguments make no sense. And she spends virtually no time on what she sees as a solution: banning guns.

Rantz: Teacher issues ‘veiled threat’ to parents over LGBT lesson plan

Stop focusing on solutions!

Hitchen’s editorial is titled “Guns are the Problem. Until the United States enacts real reforms, school shootings will persist.

But she doesn’t spend much time explaining why the guns are the problem. In fact, she completely ignores how they are the problem by simply stating that they are.

Instead, most of his article explains what is not the solution because its end goal is gun control.

But his stance on some non-controversial, easy-to-implement solutions or mitigation strategies is alarming. She seems willing to let children be vulnerable as part of her larger goal of banning guns.

A locked door turns schools into prisons, or something like that

Most businesses and government offices have limited entry points. Often there is only one. But if you do that in a school, Hitchen thinks they become prisons. His position is as bizarre as it is laughable, especially since the building that houses Pierce County Council has an entry point for the general public.

Hitchen says creating ‘an entry point’ would turn ‘public schools into prisons’ [and] will not solve the problem.

Although she does not explain how an entry point turns a school into a prison, she relies on her experience as a teacher. Her old school had two entrances that were locked during the school day.

“More than 800 students entered and exited the same doors at the same time with each passing period. Schools are designed to move people through spaces quickly and safely. Getting everyone through one door means wasted instructional time, increased congestion, increased frustration and anxiety,” she writes.

Hitchen makes no sense

What the hell is she talking about? What school only has two doors so that students can pass from one class to another? during the school day?

Most school buildings on this planet already have limited entry points. And inside, with these larger spaces called “corridors,” students can move to and from rooms called “classrooms” that have one or two doors that can accommodate a dozen students who walk in and out at any time.

There is no wasted teaching time at the start of the day when you have limited entry points. Students are fully capable of entering and exiting a doorway. Or is Hitchen advocating for classrooms without walls? Didn’t Hitchen’s school have hallways?

An entry point doesn’t always mean a small door either. It is an entry point — there may be several doors at the front of the school. And it seems odd that Hitchen is likely willing to lock her house door to protect herself from entering strangers, but won’t offer this basic, uncontroversial tool to vulnerable students and staff.

Channeling your inner ‘ACAB’

Just say no to school resource officers (SROs), argues Hitchen, after complaining that schools shouldn’t have locked doors and a single point of entry. Although the county building has armed protection, your children don’t deserve it.

“There is very little evidence that shows armed police in schools reduce shooting. It could be a deterrent. This may be the reason why an elementary school is chosen rather than a secondary school. But the reality is that a cop with a pistol is going to be challenged to handle someone with multiple semi-automatic weapons with extended magazines,” she wrote.

This is another argument totally disconnected from reality.

The data is limited because there haven’t really been many studies, although what we have is mixed. But given that there are over 20,000 SROs and, despite what Democrats and the media claim, very few mass school shootings, one could argue that the benefits of officers are understated.

Hitchen’s only argument is that one pistol against multiple semi-automatic weapons is not effective. But they are currently using their handguns to arrest criminals armed with semi-automatic weapons outside of school. All she is arguing is that we either need more than one SRO on campus or a better armed SRO.

Don’t focus on sanity

If mental health issues played a role in a shooting, you are expected to delete that information.

Hitchen says she’s fine with more money for mental health services (how generous of her). She argues that “blaming mass shootings for mental health is stigmatizing and ignores the fact that people with mental health issues are far more likely to be victims of gun violence than the perpetrators.”

I’m not sure anyone blames the mass shootings uniquely on mental health, but that does not stigmatize anyone.

People with untreated mental illness can be prone to violence. There is a bizarre movement to whitewash the reality of certain mental illnesses on the grounds that it might stigmatize someone. Frankly, I don’t care if it stigmatizes anyone. If it brings more focus, funding and action to get people the help they need so they don’t turn to violence against anyone or themselves, that’s a victoire.

And, no, pointing this out doesn’t ignore people struggling with mental illness. It does the opposite: it sheds much-needed light on a serious issue that people like Hitchen pretend to want to address, but won’t because it might stigmatize.

Already ban firearms

Hitchen offers the bare minimum of arguments against one of the uncontroversial and effective tools to stop school shootings because it has only one goal: gun confiscation. Why waste time researching strategies she doesn’t seem to understand when your end goal is the erosion of our right to bear arms?

She first brags about the anti-gun legislation Washington state lawmakers have passed. To my knowledge, nothing she mentions (red flag laws, background checks on private gun sales) has stopped school shootings here. School shooters in Washington and everywhere else do not obey gun laws. They smash them and then hope that Democratic judges and prosecutors, inspired by Democratic light-on-crime policies, will put them into restorative justice programs instead of jailing them.

Hitchen argues that “we should continue to lead the way by banning assault weapons, requiring a license to have a gun like we do for cars, and more.”

That’s his whole argument.

How was this published, exactly?

Hitchen does not define “assault weapons” because every weapon is an “assault weapon”. It’s a meaningless term and considerably lazier than the standard “military-style weapon” line that proponents use.

It does not explain what type of license should be required to own a firearm. If this is just a ploy to impose more onerous restrictions on gun rights, fortunately we now have a United States Supreme Court that values ​​the explicit rights guaranteed to us by our constitution.

And what is the “and more” to which it refers? She doesn’t even know. I would have asked him on my radio show, but his office turned down an interview request – a sign of someone who really knows his stuff!

If you wonder how such a poorly written editorial got published, just look at the newspaper it is in and the mediocre columnist who edits the section. Yes, it now makes sense. The Tacoma News Tribune is Pierce County Public Relations Firm for the Democratic Partyand it constantly reminds us why local news is dying.

If you’re serious about stopping school shootings — or any kind of violence — we’d be wise to ignore clueless, unhelpful ideologues like Hitchen. She’s more anti-gun than pro-school safety.

Listen to the Jason Rantz Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 p.m. on KTTH 770 AM (HD Radio 97.3 FM HD-Channel 3). Subscribe to the podcast here. Follow @JasonRantz on Twitter, instagramand Facebook. Check back frequently for more news and analysis.

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23 Comprehensive Mental Health Crisis Response Trainings | News, Sports, Jobs https://dystonia-dreams.org/23-comprehensive-mental-health-crisis-response-trainings-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 16:32:50 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/23-comprehensive-mental-health-crisis-response-trainings-news-sports-jobs/ Maui Police Department recruits and officers, state judiciary employees and other Crisis Response Team training participants pose for a photo. photo MPD The Maui Police Department recruits were among 23 people who underwent Crisis Intervention Team training on how to interact with those who potentially suffer from mental illness or are going through an emotional […]]]>

Maui Police Department recruits and officers, state judiciary employees and other Crisis Response Team training participants pose for a photo. photo MPD

The Maui Police Department recruits were among 23 people who underwent Crisis Intervention Team training on how to interact with those who potentially suffer from mental illness or are going through an emotional crisis.

The 40 hours of training, which ended on Friday, focused on de-escalating a situation before it reaches a point of violence or self-harm while ensuring people get the response and proper care they need, according to an MPD press release.

Those who completed the program included MPD officers, state judicial employees, security personnel from the Four Seasons Resort Maui in Wailea and Montage Kapalua Bay, members of the MPD Multi-Cultural Advisory Counsel and employees from Roberts Hawaii, Project Vision, Family Life Center-Molokai, Ka Foundation Hale A Ke Ola and Maui Aloha.

The class was the 12th since the program launched in 2013, bringing the number of people who have completed the training to 188.

Alicia Rodriguez, law enforcement clinical psychologist at Waves of Insight, led the training.

The program is part of MPD’s Critical Outreach and Response through Education unit which works with community organizations on issues involving the homeless and people with mental illness.

MPD recruits John Asuncion, Michael Asuncion, Luna Guarriello, Austin Hughes, Goro Iijima, Taylor Lee, Michael Means, Nathan Samonte and Micah Takamiya completed training; MPD officers Tyson Baza-Triulzi, Clarence Kenui and Cody Tetzloff; Nico Bonilla of Four Seasons Resort Maui in Wailea, Christopher Freitas and Bernard Olsen of Roberts Hawaii, Randy Gallegos of Montage Resorts, Robin Garrison of Project Vision, 2nd Circuit Judge Kirstin Hamman, Keisa Liu of MPD Multi-Cultural Advisory Council, Kimo Orlando of Molokai Family Life Center, Dr. Arlene Ricalde-Garcia, Kurt Schmidt from Ka Hale A Ke Ola and Tiare Sua from Maui Aloha Foundation.


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Eating Well: The Link Between Gut Health and Mental Health https://dystonia-dreams.org/eating-well-the-link-between-gut-health-and-mental-health/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 08:30:50 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/eating-well-the-link-between-gut-health-and-mental-health/ We quite often use expressions such as “follow your gut” or “listen to your gut” when we have to make crucial decisions. Have you experienced “butterflies in your stomach” or “numbness in your stomach” when you are anxious? Well, you’re probably getting signals from an unexpected source: your second brain, the gut. Gut health can […]]]>

We quite often use expressions such as “follow your gut” or “listen to your gut” when we have to make crucial decisions. Have you experienced “butterflies in your stomach” or “numbness in your stomach” when you are anxious? Well, you’re probably getting signals from an unexpected source: your second brain, the gut. Gut health can directly influence the expression and management of our Mental Health including depression, anxiety and stress.

The gut microbiome is the community of microbes and their genes that reside in the gastrointestinal tract and are a key driver of neurobiological and behavioral development.

Human microbiome research clearly links gut dynamics to neurobiological development in children.

Dysbiosis (increase in unhealthy bacteria in the gut) affects behavior in infants and toddlers, such as fear or fear, depression or disconnection, irritability and anxiety/nervousness, and cognitive development such as learning, speaking, concentration and analytical thinking.

Diet can help your bacteria protect your mental well-being because eating the right foods feeds the good bacteria. (Source: Getty Images/Thinkstock)

Evidence from human studies of autism spectrum disorders suggests that the microbiome continues to play an active role in behavioral and cognitive development.

The connection between the intestine The microbiome and subclinical behavioral changes are clearly important because normal behavior and behavioral disturbances develop in childhood and this developmental period provides opportunities to intervene and treat many mental health or behavioral disorders as they appear.

The microbiome in children communicates with the central nervous system to influence social, academic, and cognitive behavior through multiple pathways that include neuroendocrine and immune system coordination, vagus nerve stimulation and neurotransmitters.

Let’s look at the different gut health mechanisms that influence children’s mental and behavioral health:

Like the brain, the lining of the gut is full of nerves called the enteric nervous system, or ENS, also known as the “second brain.” The enteric nervous system has neurons and neurotransmitters similar to those found in your central nervous system. The ENS lines your entire digestive system with over 100 million nerve cells forming two layers. It goes from the esophagus to the rectum.

This brain-gut connection affects your digestion, mood and the way you think. The ENS secretes chemicals like dopamine, serotonin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. All of these are mood-regulating chemicals. A healthy gut microbiota works to some extent as a shield against anxiety and depression in children. Diet can help your bacteria protect your mental well-being because eating the right foods feeds the good bacteria. When there are many different healthy bacteria, your microbiome is more diverse and produces substances that increase mood-enhancing chemicals, such as dopamine, serotonin, and GABA.

The two-way communication between the central nervous system and the gut microbiota is called the gut-brain axis and is linked to several mental illnesses, including anxiety and the Depression that are becoming common among children today.

A normal or vaginal birth exposes a newborn to a diverse range of microorganisms, while babies born by caesarean section receive a partially different and less diverse microbiome. Children born through normal childbirth are likely to have better mental health.

intestine Lifestyle has a great impact on the intestinal flora. An active lifestyle from childhood can guarantee good insects (Source: Dreamstime)

Breastfeeding infants is a major contributor to good gut health. Breastfed infants have a richer and more diverse microbiome than formula-fed infants. Breastmilk oligosaccharides, the powerful prebiotic an infant receives through breastmilk, influence the gut health and mental health of infants throughout childhood. Exclusive breastfeeding of infants up to six months ensures gut biodiversity and allows infants to develop into children with fewer instances of depression, anxiety, anger and learning disabilities.

The diversity of microorganisms continues to grow with the introduction of solid foods and also with environmental exposure (mud, play, etc.). Introducing a variety of solid foods impacts the range of microorganisms in the gut. A diet rich in various food groups such as vegetables, whole grains, fermented foods, fruits, legumes give rise to healthy bacteria. While a diet high in sugary drinks, processed foods, artificial sweeteners and junk foods gives rise to bad bacteria.

Excessive cleanliness and sanitation practices can compromise the microbiome. Exposure to natural flora through mud play, ground play, etc. can help to develop intestinal bacteria beautifully. The good bacteria present in the mud help the brain to release a hormone of happiness. Not only that, it strengthens the immune system and promotes child development in every way. The next time you try to get extra careful with your child’s potty training, just remember that you risk compromising their gut microbiome and cognitive functions. health.

Lifestyle has a great impact on the intestinal flora. An active lifestyle from childhood can ensure good insects. However, a sedentary child will have poor gut health. A sedentary lifestyle and thoughtless diet are the main causes of obesity in children, which makes them dull and anxious over a period of time. Obesity also impairs gut health, leading to poor mental health.

It’s important for your little one to have plenty of good bacteria and a healthy gut microbiome as they grow to ensure they develop into physically and mentally healthy individuals!

Manjari Chandra is Consultant in Functional Nutrition and Nutritional Medicine, Manjari Wellness, New Delhi. His column appears fortnightly.

For all the latest parenting news, download Indian Express app.

]]> Asks that the mental health of both parents be taken into account during the perinatal period https://dystonia-dreams.org/asks-that-the-mental-health-of-both-parents-be-taken-into-account-during-the-perinatal-period/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 15:00:01 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/asks-that-the-mental-health-of-both-parents-be-taken-into-account-during-the-perinatal-period/ Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public domain Perinatal mood disorders such as postnatal depression and perinatal anxiety can affect both mothers and fathers simultaneously, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis by UCL researchers. About 3 in 100 couples (3.18%) both suffered from late postnatal depression, which occurs three to 12 months after the birth of a […]]]>

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public domain

Perinatal mood disorders such as postnatal depression and perinatal anxiety can affect both mothers and fathers simultaneously, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis by UCL researchers.

About 3 in 100 couples (3.18%) both suffered from late postnatal depression, which occurs three to 12 months after the birth of a child.

Meanwhile, in about 2 in 100 couples, both parents suffered from prenatal depression – before the baby was born – (1.72%) and early postnatal depression – up to 12 weeks after birth – (2, 37%).

The study, published in Open JAMA Networkanalyzed 23 studies with data from 29,286 couples who had low-risk pregnancies, published between 1st January 1990 and 8e June 2021.

The results showed that mothers who experienced psychosocial factors, such as early stressors, limited social support and exposure to domestic violence were at higher risk of developing a perinatal mood disorder.

For fathers, the main factors associated with an increased risk of perinatal mood disorder were low education, unemployment, low social support and marital distress.

And previous studies show that a history of mood disorders increases the possibility of both parents developing a common mental disorder.

However, a recent article written by members of the study team demonstrated that up to 40% of new mothers do not benefit from a postnatal examination 6 to 8 weeks after delivery, although it is recommended. by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). And for men, such control does not exist at all.

As a result, the researchers believe that the current model of postnatal care needs to be reassessed and should additionally focus on social determinants and relationships between expectant parents to identify couples at risk.

Lead author Dr Kara Smythe (UCL Institute of Epidemiology & Health) said: “In high-income countries like the US and UK, over 80% of women and over 70% of men become parents. Each year more than 650,000 babies are born, so with prevalence rates of 2-3% for depression in both members of the parenting dyad, the potential burden is considerable.

“Mood disturbances in one parent can impact the other parent, and paternal depression has been shown to lead to increased symptoms of depression in mothers during pregnancy and in the first six months postpartum. partum.

“Perinatal mood disorders in parents are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, impaired bonding with the newborn, and behavioral problems in their children. The co-occurrence of mood disorders in two parents may amplify these negative outcomes; however, prevalence data are lacking.

“This information is needed to inform health care priority setting and facilitate a move towards a family-centered model of care that better serves mothers and fathers as they transition into parenthood.”

In the systematic review, researchers found that in high-income countries, 11% of new mothers suffer from maternal depression during pregnancy and 13% after the baby is born.

Meanwhile, an existing meta-analysis of 21 countries estimated that 9.76% of fathers suffered from paternal depression during pregnancy and 8.75% during the first postnatal year.

The paternal anxiety rate is also multiplied by three when the mother is depressed.

Perinatal mood disorders have also been found to progress throughout pregnancy and in the months following delivery. Women are three times more likely, and men nine times more likely, to develop postnatal depression if they suffered from depression in the months before the child was born.

Dr Smythe said: “Perinatal depression can have a prolonged course; most men and women who have depressive symptoms at 4 and 8 weeks postpartum continue to have symptoms at 6 months postpartum. , and some develop symptoms later in the postnatal period.

“Future research should determine the longitudinal course of coexisting perinatal mood disorders in both parents, which may alter clinical practice. The focus on postnatal depression typically focuses on the first 12 weeks after birth. childbirth, as evidenced by practice guidelines.

“However, our findings suggest that clinical attention to perinatal mood disorders may need to extend beyond the early postnatal period.”

Study limitations

Data came from 15 different countries that used a range of screening tools, contributing to the observed heterogeneity. A random-effect meta-analysis was adopted to account for this, but the model gave greater weight to smaller studies, which may have limited the validity of the results obtained. A smaller sample size also means that the estimates from these studies are less precise.

Although several studies excluded patients with a history of mental health problems, this was not done consistently. Thus, it is impossible to identify true incident cases.

Most of the studies were conducted in high-income countries, so the results may not apply to low- or middle-income countries. The search also did not yield studies examining perinatal mood disorders in both parents outside of a heteronormative context.


Increased risk of depression in young people if their mother suffered from depression during or after pregnancy


More information:
Prevalence of perinatal depression and anxiety in both parents: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Open JAMA Network (2022). DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.18969

Provided by University College London


Quote: Calls for mental health of both parents to be considered during the perinatal period (2022, June 24) Retrieved June 24, 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-06-mental-health-parents- perinatal-period. html

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Government-funded mental health services underutilized in Australian elderly care: study https://dystonia-dreams.org/government-funded-mental-health-services-underutilized-in-australian-elderly-care-study/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 07:16:45 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/government-funded-mental-health-services-underutilized-in-australian-elderly-care-study/ Less than three per cent of Australians with mental disorders living in aged care facilities have access to government-funded mental health services, according to an analysis by South Australian researchers. The study’s lead author and registrar of psychology and epidemiologist at Flinders University, Dr. Monica Cations, said older residents are four times more likely to […]]]>

Less than three per cent of Australians with mental disorders living in aged care facilities have access to government-funded mental health services, according to an analysis by South Australian researchers.

The study’s lead author and registrar of psychology and epidemiologist at Flinders University, Dr. Monica Cations, said older residents are four times more likely to suffer from depression and nine times more likely to have anxiety disorders than the general population of older Australians.

“Despite this, less than three percent of residents with a mental health condition in our cohort accessed funding grants for mental health services provided by general practitioners, psychiatrists or allied health professionals, unlike to almost 10% of the general population,” she said. in a statement from Flinders University on Wednesday.

Analyzing data from the Australian Senior Citizens Register on all non-Indigenous people with mental health conditions living in nearly three thousand aged care facilities between 2012 and 2017, the study found that there were no only a minimal increase in access in different categories over the period, with only 2.4% accessed primary mental health care services in 2016-2017 and only 2.3% accessed services of psychiatry.

Cations said people with dementia were less likely than those without conditions to access any of the services other than psychiatry.

“The under-identification and lack of non-pharmacological treatment of mental illness in people with dementia is a long-documented problem, partly due to a widespread belief that people with dementia cannot benefit from non-pharmacological therapies,” she said.

The need for equitable access to mental health services

The study authors acknowledge that residents of aged care facilities may have received mental health care services not captured by the team’s dataset, but point out that those living in Aged care facilities should have equitable access to public services.

“Mental health care is a mainstay of the publicly funded healthcare system in Australia, and the low uptake of publicly funded services among people living in aged care facilities is indicative of major barriers to accessing and using services,” Cations said.

She went on to say that many of these barriers have been raised in submissions to the Royal Commission on the Quality and Safety of Elderly Care and include lack of expertise among the workforce, working conditions eligibility, transportation costs, and low priority given to cases where care was unlikely to be disrupted or burdensome for residents and staff.

Based on the recommendations of the Royal Commission’s final report and considering how best to implement them, the study’s authors recommend continuously expanding eligibility criteria for Medicare access, refining existing staff, integrating mental health workers into elder care services, clearer referral pathways and vigilant monitoring of programs to ensure quality and adequate investment.

“Our study indicates the need for significant and sustained organizational, policy and funding changes to improve access to mental health care for older residents,” Cations said.

Titled ‘Government-funded mental health services are underutilized in Australian aged care settings’, the study has been accepted for publication in the journal ‘Australian Health Review’.

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Mental health awareness matters every month of the year https://dystonia-dreams.org/mental-health-awareness-matters-every-month-of-the-year/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 04:38:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/mental-health-awareness-matters-every-month-of-the-year/ As Mental Health Awareness Month came to a close at the end of May, I would like to emphasize the importance of continuing our awareness through the remaining eleven months of the year. According to Mental Health America, at 23.64%, Ohio is the state with the fourth highest percentage of adults with mental illness […]]]>

As Mental Health Awareness Month came to a close at the end of May, I would like to emphasize the importance of continuing our awareness through the remaining eleven months of the year.

According to Mental Health America, at 23.64%, Ohio is the state with the fourth highest percentage of adults with mental illness in 2022. At 6.09%, it has the third highest percentage number of adults with serious suicidal thoughts in 2022.

This means that almost 1 in 4 of your friends, colleagues, family and neighbors have mental health issues. These statistics may be hard to hear, but they are essential to understanding the severity of this crisis in our state.

Mental health affects all aspects of life, including mood, behavior, relationships, interests, and even physical health. So what can we do to help, especially as workforce leaders? I would like to provide you with some resources that I have found useful in professional and personal contexts.

The Ohio Department of Insurance issued a Employer Toolkit on Mental Health in the Workplace which promotes mental health in the workplace by equipping employers and employees with the right tools to navigate this struggle. It explains mental illness and the stigma surrounding it, as well as how to combat this stigma. It emphasizes the importance of the words we use and offers helpful substitutes for avoidable terms. It offers helpful tips on adjusting workplace culture to support employee mental health and details specific legislation and benefits requirements that employers should be aware of.

Similarly, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce website features a Opioid Toolkit, an eight-module course that aims to provide employers with the resources to manage conflict related to substance use disorders that can arise in the workplace. Substance use disorders are mental disorders, and it is important that we navigate the stigma against them with empathy and care.

On the legislative side, let’s talk about the Mental Illness Insurance Parity Act. These laws require health insurance plans that cover mental health and substance use disorders to provide this coverage in the same way as the physical health benefits that are covered. In the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Ohio Department of Insurance’s joint 2022 Ohio Mental Health Parity Reportdepartments detail the state’s completed and ongoing efforts to support enforcement of these laws, as well as general support for communication, education, and outreach efforts related to mental health awareness.

For child-specific resources, Nationwide Children’s Hospital has launched the On our sleeves country. The web page offers help for children and parents struggling with mental health issues. Its goal is to start the important conversations and provide support to a demographic that we often overlook when considering these complex issues.

We live in a difficult time. There is no shame in experiencing mental health issues, now or never. Ohio has many great people who are dedicated to creating resources that we can use to help support our employees, friends and families, and we should all take advantage of them in times of need.

Steve Stivers is the President and CEO of the Ohio Chamber of Commerce.

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Young people are more open about mental health, but barriers remain | Health https://dystonia-dreams.org/young-people-are-more-open-about-mental-health-but-barriers-remain-health/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/young-people-are-more-open-about-mental-health-but-barriers-remain-health/ Mia Flegal speaks to college students about her bouts of anxiety and depression and the toll mental illness can have on children and teens, when a female student raises her hand to ask a heartbreaking question: “What should I do if no one believes me? » When children struggle with their mental well-being and mental […]]]>

Mia Flegal speaks to college students about her bouts of anxiety and depression and the toll mental illness can have on children and teens, when a female student raises her hand to ask a heartbreaking question:

“What should I do if no one believes me? »






When children struggle with their mental well-being and mental health, it can feel different than it does for adults – and the signals of distress can manifest in subtle or easily written off ways.

Flegal, who just finished 10th grade at Nashua High School North, said she first experienced symptoms of her generalized anxiety disorder when she was about 8 years old. She started having trouble sleeping and started noticing that the worry made it hard to breathe.

“It starts with this pit in my stomach,” Flegal said. “That hole in your stomach is starting to move up to your chest, and you feel like someone is squeezing you.”

She remembers waking up in a cold sweat at the age of 10 on a trip away from home. Her mother, Sheelu Flegal, remembers picking her up soon after a sleepover when the usually outgoing and talkative Mia felt trapped in her anxiety.

Her classmate at Nashua North, Aarika Roy, said she remembered her anxiety starting with an upset stomach when she was in fifth grade.

Erin Murphy, who is now finishing her 11th year at Windham, recalled when she came home from college to find herself shaking, unable to stop crying and hyperventilating.

“It’s hard to tell if this is some sort of growth phase or if it’s becoming something,” Flegal said.

While it’s upsetting to think of elementary and middle-aged children struggling with anxiety, depression or other mental illnesses, Flegal said, it does happen. Being able to talk about bad feelings can help.

“It can’t be a subject that’s super quiet,” Flegal said.

The pandemic and growing panic around social media has brought to light the enormity of the mental health issues facing children and adolescents today.

According to a survey by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in three high school students reported poor mental health during the pandemic. Half said they constantly felt sad or hopeless. (cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/abes.htm)

Gen Z, born between 1997 and 2012, is gaining a reputation for being more open about mental health, but Flegal still isn’t sure her peers are comfortable talking about their mental health in a meaningful, serious way. .

“A lot of what Gen Z does is make a joke about it. But making a joke about it is not the same as asking for help,” Flegal said. “If the jokes are the first step, that’s fine, but ultimately we have to encourage people to ask for help.”







Mia Flegal

Mia Flegal at her home in Nashua on June 10, 2022. She struggled with anxiety and now helps young students with mental health.




Ask for help

More and more resources are coming online to deal with acute crises, such as New Hampshire’s new “Rapid Response Access Point” for people who need crisis help, and the Helpline. national listener, 988, which will be activated on July 16. And the state hopes to open more beds this fall at Hampstead Hospital, for children and teens who need more intensive care.

Community mental health centers across the state can connect people to treatment and make connections to help with other aspects of a person’s life.

Rik Cornell, vice-president of community relations at the Greater Manchester Community Mental Health Center, said the center had been able to place staff in almost every school in the city to work with students and train staff, and was providing similar help to summer programs.

“For so many years sanity has sat and waited for people to come to it. That’s not what we do anymore,” Cornell said. “We can’t keep picking up the pieces. We must prevent these parts from collapsing.

Yet there are barriers to getting help.

When Aarika Roy, Flegal’s classmate at Nashua North, had a bad anxiety attack two years ago, Roy said her family tried to call therapists all over New Hampshire and Massachusetts for nearly two years, but they had never been able to get an appointment. with a psychologist.

Cornell said there was a serious and growing shortage of psychologists, therapists and all sorts of other healthcare workers – but he said families with plenty of money had an easier time getting a therapy and other mental health care.

Many therapists are reluctant to accept health insurance because it can be difficult to persuade insurance companies to pay for their services. Cornell said some therapists are accepting new patients — as long as those patients can pay cash.

But Cornell said the 10 community mental health centers in New Hampshire (nhcbha.org) can help people who do not have access to mental health care.

“Call us,” Cornell said. “We’ll see what we can do to get you in.”

To manage all alone

Unable to see a therapist, Roy said she found other ways to deal with her anxiety – drawing on her family’s Hindu spirituality and even browsing YouTube for videos on breathing and meditation.

Flegal said she also found ways to cope.

She started keeping a diary after bouts of anxiety, working through her thoughts. In the middle of an attack, when she’s stuck in a cycle of hyperventilating and crying, she counts her breaths, or grabs a few ice cubes and squeezes them to “shock” her body out of the cycle.

These coping mechanisms have evolved over the years, Flegal said, but she said having people to talk to — family, friends, trusted teachers — helps her stay informed. things.

In the pandemic, however, Flegal said, much of that support network has disappeared — an experience shared by many children and adults.

Isolated from friends, with limited chances to interact with teachers as Nashua remained in remote learning for much of the 2020-21 school year, Flegal said she would roll out of bed minutes before a Zoom lesson and would sit quietly in front of his computer. with the camera off. When she came out of class, she would go in the shower, put on some music and cry.

“I was stuck in a hole,” she said. “You haven’t seen an end to it, and it’s so difficult.” She was afraid to ask for help, worried that she would somehow be a burden on her family or increase tensions at home.

But when she acknowledged those feelings of despair, Flegal said, her family listened, supported and helped.

“Asking for help doesn’t make you weak and it doesn’t have a negative effect on those around you,” she said.

feel less alone

Family members, teachers, coaches – anyone who gets to know a child or adolescent well – can keep an eye out for changes in behavior and ask questions about them, such as changes in sleep or hygiene , said Diana Schryver, clinical co-ordinator of the children’s department at the Mental Health Center of Greater Manchester.

Adults can ask behavioral questions first, gently, and from there open up a conversation for a young person to talk about their emotions and mental well-being.

“One of the things we talk about to help people do is develop their observation skills,” Schryver said. “It may not be a crisis, but it could be a building crisis.”

Murphy, the student from Windham, recalls an eighth grade teacher taking her aside one day, when she came to school in her pajamas and with her hair tied up, to ask how she was doing . This conversation gave Murphy the space to admit for the first time that she was not well.

“He asked me if I was okay, and the answer was no,” Murphy said.

She is grateful that the professor made the effort to check.

Feeling safe to talk about feelings, especially difficult feelings, is important even for young children. Flegal said she works with community groups to develop programs where she can talk to younger kids, talk about her mental health history and try to help other kids feel comfortable talking about their own feelings.

Flegal said she was open about her mental health issues because she wanted others — especially young children — to see that it is safe to talk about their mental health. To this girl who asked what to do if no one believed her about her mental health issues, Flegal said to keep talking.

Schryver said the same thing.

“To this kid, I would say, don’t stop talking. Don’t stop asking for help until you feel you are getting the help you need.

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Tri-County Mental Health Services Announces New Senior Staff https://dystonia-dreams.org/tri-county-mental-health-services-announces-new-senior-staff/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:07:33 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/tri-county-mental-health-services-announces-new-senior-staff/ LEWISTON — Tri-County Mental Health Services has announced the addition of Leslie Ogilvie, Colin O’Neill and Katherine Morissette to its leadership team. Ogilvie has been named the new Director of Grants and Communications. Previously, she worked as a project manager and senior research associate for a small research firm that conducted program evaluations, needs assessments, […]]]>

LEWISTON — Tri-County Mental Health Services has announced the addition of Leslie Ogilvie, Colin O’Neill and Katherine Morissette to its leadership team.

Ogilvie has been named the new Director of Grants and Communications. Previously, she worked as a project manager and senior research associate for a small research firm that conducted program evaluations, needs assessments, and strategic planning to help build and sustain resilient and healthy communities.

Ogilvie brings experience in engaging with community members, families, government officials and other stakeholders on issues related to health care policy, mental and behavioral health care needs, social service challenges and access to disability and other benefits. Ogilvie holds a master’s degree in public administration and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

O’Neill was appointed to the position of clinical director. He is an energetic, results-oriented mental health administrator who brings over 25 years of management, planning and consulting experience in the public and not-for-profit sectors.

O’Neill previously served as Associate Commissioner for the Maine Department of Corrections, where he oversaw all field and facility operations, programming and contracts for the Juvenile Division. He also served as Assistant Superintendent of Treatment Programs at the Long Creek Youth Development Center, where he worked as a behavioral health treatment provider and administrator.

He recently completed a fellowship at the John T. Gorman Foundation focused on advanced results-oriented leadership skills. O’Neill said, “I have experienced first-hand the success that community-based programs and treatments can have in reducing the number of people institutionalized in hospitals, jails, and prisons while improving their clinical outcomes. It convinced me that the future of promoting hope and healing in Maine is through the continued creation and improvement of community-based behavioral health care.

Morissette has been appointed Community Housing Manager. She joins the organization with extensive work experience in healthcare management and patient care. She most recently worked as the Patient Access Supervisor at Mid Coast Hospital and previously held several positions at Sweetser, including Residential Supervisor and Assistant Supervisor of the Adult Crisis Stabilization Unit, and Supervisor of children’s residential campus night.

Morissette received her Master of Science in Occupational Therapy from the University of Southern Maine and her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Husson University. Managing Director Catherine R. Ryder said, “Katie will be a great addition to our leadership team. We look forward to working closely with her to improve the residential treatment and recovery-oriented environment we provide to our family, friends and neighbors living with serious and persistent mental illness and medical issues in our community. .

Leslie Ogilvie joins Tri-County Mental Health Services.

Colin O’Neill joins Tri-County Mental Health Services.

Katherine Morissette joins Tri-County Mental Health Services.

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Gun violence bill turns to mental health and could be alleviated https://dystonia-dreams.org/gun-violence-bill-turns-to-mental-health-and-could-be-alleviated/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 12:57:54 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/gun-violence-bill-turns-to-mental-health-and-could-be-alleviated/ The chief Republican negotiator of the gun safety framework bill has warned that some provisions could be “lightened”. Roll Call reports that because the framework focuses on mental health, advocates are excited that it expands access but are wary because mental health is not strongly linked to gun homicides. The Hill: Cornyn warns gun safety […]]]>

The chief Republican negotiator of the gun safety framework bill has warned that some provisions could be “lightened”. Roll Call reports that because the framework focuses on mental health, advocates are excited that it expands access but are wary because mental health is not strongly linked to gun homicides.

The Hill: Cornyn warns gun safety framework may need to be lightened

Sen. John Cornyn (Texas), the top Republican negotiator for a bipartisan gun safety framework, said Wednesday some issues still need to be ironed out and warned the package may need to be slimmed down in order to pass a bill. of law. Cornyn said he’s “beginning to worry” about the deadlock on “a few issues that need to be worked out before we can come to an agreement.” (Bolton, 6/15)

Roll Call: Mental Health Becomes Focus of Senate Gun Framework

Mental health advocates are walking a fine line on the framework of the Senate’s bipartisan gun violence package – happy that it contains long-sought provisions to expand access to treatment while pointing out that there are few link between firearm homicides and mental illness. A framework released Sunday calls for expanding access to mental health care across the country, with opponents of gun control framing such provisions as part of the solution to curb mass shootings. (Hellman, 6/15)

Learn more about the gun violence epidemic —

Reuters: VP Harris to launch online harassment task force after shootings

US Vice President Kamala Harris will inaugurate a task force on Thursday to tackle online harassment, fulfilling one of the Biden campaign’s promises following a mass shooting that highlights a link between online abuse. line and violence. The group will be tasked with producing within six months a detailed plan of actions to address the issue, including more support for victims, prevention and greater accountability of abusers and the platforms that host them. (6/16)

The Washington Post: Buffalo Grocery Massacre suspect charged with federal hate crimes

Payton Gendron, an 18-year-old white man, was charged Wednesday with federal hate crimes and a federal firearm offense in the mass shooting at a Buffalo grocery store that left 10 black people dead on month, making him potentially eligible for the death penalty. Authorities announced the 27-count indictment as Attorney General Merrick Garland met in Buffalo with dozens of survivors of the May 14 shooting and family members of those who were killed. He spoke in general terms about the federal government’s efforts to combat the rise of white nationalism. (Nakamura, 06/15)

The Texas Tribune: Uvalde lacked mental health resources before Robb school shooting

BR was 12 when she tried to overdose on Midol in her rural college bathroom in Uvalde last year after school bullying became too much to bear. The girl’s first appointment with a counselor from the government-funded mental health authority finally took place in May, a year and a month after that suicide attempt. Now her family fears that the limitations of the small-town system they rely on make them ill-equipped to meet the needs of children like her – suicidal, isolated and with little between her and another suicide attempt. . (Harper and Beeferman, 6/16)

ABC News: Some Texas school districts to require see-through backpacks in wake of Uvalde shooting

Several school districts in Texas are requiring students to use see-through backpacks following last month’s fatal shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde. The Ingleside Independent School District, near Corpus Christi, became one of the latest to announce the new policy this week, after its board unanimously approved the code policy update. district dress code to require see-through backpacks beginning in the 2022-23 school year. (Deliso, 6/15)

Politico: Matthew McConaughey pushes for arms push

Matthew McConaughey doesn’t leave his emotional calls for tougher gun laws to chance and the lure of his celebrity. He also turns to K Street. Following a series of recent mass shootings, including last month’s massacre in his hometown of Uvalde, Texas, which killed 19 schoolchildren and two teachers, the award-winning actor has retained the services of a team of lobbyists within DC Avisa Partners. to represent him in the nation’s capital. The filing, filed Wednesday, is under the name of an Encino, Calif. holding company registered in McConaughey’s name, Barefoot Money Inc. The form also shows that the Washington veterans group at Avisa Partners will pressure on possession issues.” (Oprysko, 6/15)

Also –

The New York Times: Venue cancels concert of John Hinckley Jr., who shot President Reagan

The John Hinckley Jr. concert in Brooklyn, an oddity that was to feature music from a man best known for trying to kill a US president, was canceled on Wednesday by the venue, which cited fears of a backlash in a “dangerously radicalized”. , reactionary climate. … The statement went on to say that although they believe ex-convicts and people with mental illnesses should be able to earn a chance to “fully reintegrate into society”, they made the decision after considering ” very real and escalating threats and hatred”. to our vulnerable communities. (Jacobs and Guarino, 6/15)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage by major news outlets. Sign up for an email subscription.

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Theme, Meaning and Importance of Men’s Mental Health https://dystonia-dreams.org/theme-meaning-and-importance-of-mens-mental-health/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 04:06:25 +0000 https://dystonia-dreams.org/theme-meaning-and-importance-of-mens-mental-health/ Men’s Health Week 2022: Seeking therapy is a great way to cope with mental health issues Importance International Men’s Health Week was launched by six leading organizations that focus on men’s health. He was refereed at the 2nd World Meeting by the World Congress on Men’s Health in Vienna, Austria in 2002. Men’s Health Week […]]]>

Men’s Health Week 2022: Seeking therapy is a great way to cope with mental health issues

Importance

International Men’s Health Week was launched by six leading organizations that focus on men’s health. He was refereed at the 2nd World Meeting by the World Congress on Men’s Health in Vienna, Austria in 2002.

Men’s Health Week was commemorated as a step towards raising awareness of global issues related to the health and well-being of men and boys. The goal is to change mindsets and policies that promote better health.

The University of Western Sydney aims to inspire communities around the world to come together and work to improve the lives of people.

Theme

Men’s Health Week has been celebrated in mid-June every year since 2002. The idea of ​​observing Men’s Health Week every year is to bring attention and awareness to the well-being of men. men around the world.

This year’s theme, as announced by the University of Western Sydney, is “Creating Healthy Environments for Men and Boys”. This year’s theme emphasizes the importance of providing a better environment for men. Our society often overlooks men’s mental and emotional needs and views them as “stronger.”

The University of Western Sydney wants to draw more attention to men’s mental health this year. Through Men’s Health Week 2022, we are trying to create a welcoming environment for the needs of men around the world.

Why is raising awareness about men’s mental health important?

As mentioned earlier, the theme for this year’s Men’s Health Week is “Building Healthy Environments for Men and Boys”. Designing a healthy and engaging environment for men is more important than ever.

Mental health issues are still taboo around the world. This lack of focus on mental health prevents people from seeking the help they need. Providing a safe and professional environment for men can help reduce and combat mental health issues overall. Poor mental health poses various health complications, affects personal relationships, and hinders work productivity, among other issues.

Here are some common side effects of poor mental health:

Mood disorders

The lack of proper mental health counseling is widespread across the board. This lack of sensitivity to mental health also affects the men around us. In fact, researchers have reported that more men are affected by depression than women. Men also often suffer from stress, tension and other disturbing mood disorders due to problems at work and/or at home.

Alcohol abuse

Alcohol abuse is one of the most common by-products of mental health problems in men. Prolonged alcohol abuse can even pose a threat to physical health. Alcohol abuse can also worsen interpersonal relationships and the quality of work in the workspace.

Smoking

Smoking similar to alcohol abuse is a byproduct of poor mental health in some cases. Smoking has often been advised as a solution to excess stress and tension. However, this “solution” does more harm than good. Smoking can cause cancer and negatively affect the body’s ability to function properly.

Other chronic diseases

Prolonged undiagnosed mental problems as well as frequent alcohol and tobacco use can also cause other chronic diseases. Therefore, getting treatment for mental problems is important for physical health. Poor mental health can also alter a person’s eating habits and routine. Mental problems can cause eating disorders such as loss of appetite, binge eating, etc.

How can we contribute?

The theme for this year’s Men’s Health Week focuses on creating a better environment for men. We must take these steps to provide them with a comfortable and welcoming environment.

Here are some ways we can contribute to this cause:

Create an accepting environment

The first step towards building a healthy environment is to show solidarity. Accepting the mental needs of the men around us is a great way to start. Creating help groups and normalizing professional help-seeking can help break the taboo around mental health issues.

start early

As the theme suggests, we also need to focus on younger men. Providing boys with an environment where they can communicate their feelings and concerns is a great way to instill open dialogue about mental health.

Provide advice

In addition to providing support and creating a welcoming environment, we also need to encourage seeking professional help. Policies to implement the importance of seeking professional help. Seeking therapy, counseling, and medication if needed, are all professional and healthy ways to seek mental help.

Avoid burnout

Stress and various other mental disorders can be due to work or home burnout. Taking a break when needed can help reduce your risk of developing various mood disorders. Working out, listening to music, dancing, socializing are all proven ways to improve your mood and promote happy hormones.

Establish a healthy lifestyle

As stated above, mental health issues can arise or worsen due to the use of alcohol and other unhealthy substances. Following a healthy lifestyle that includes healthy eating, a workout routine, and socializing can help lower your chances of developing mood disorders.

In conclusion, we must aim to end the taboo surrounding mental health. We must always recognize the importance of good mental health and the need for career guidance. If you or someone you know suffers from poor mental health, we encourage you to consult a professional. Like other illnesses, mental health issues can only be treated once diagnosed by a professional.

Disclaimer: This content, including advice, provides generic information only. It does not in any way replace qualified medical advice. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim any responsibility for this information.

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